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Supplementary nurse prescribing for patients with skin conditions: a national questionnaire survey.
J Clin Nurs. 2007 Jul; 16(7):1230-7.JC

Abstract

AIM

To examine the prescribing practices of supplementary nurse prescribers (working in both primary and secondary care) who prescribe medicines for patients with skin conditions and the factors that facilitate or inhibit this mode of prescribing.

BACKGROUND

Nurses work in a variety of roles, with varying levels of expertise, are involved in the treatment management of a broad range of skin diseases. Skin conditions are those for which independent nurse prescribers prescribe most frequently. The role of the nurse, limitations of the formulary and inter-professional relationships influence the prescribing practices of these nurses. There is no evidence currently available examining the impact and activity of supplementary nurse prescribing for patients with skin conditions.

METHODS

A convenient sample of 580 nurses who prescribed for skin conditions and were qualified supplementary nurse prescriber, self-completed a written questionnaire.

RESULTS

Five hundred and twenty (89.7%) nurses were based in primary care and worked in general practice. Four hundred and thirty-six (75%) held a degree level qualification or higher, 41 (7%) had specialist dermatology training and 512 (88.3%) had more than 10 years postregistration nursing experience. Supplementary prescribing was used by a minority of nurses. Nurses who had specialist dermatology training used this mode of prescribing most frequently. Doctor and pharmacists lack of understanding of supplementary prescribing, lack of peer support and clinical management plans prevented the implementation of this mode of prescribing.

CONCLUSIONS

Supplementary prescribing is used by a minority of nurses to treat skin conditions. A number of factors prevent nurses from using this mode of prescribing including lack of specialist training and lack of support in practice.

RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE

Specialist dermatology training, an understanding of supplementary prescribing by the members of the healthcare team, and support in practice are required if supplementary prescribing is to be implemented effectively for the treatment of skin conditions.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Health and Social Care, University of Reading, Reading, UK. n.j.carey@reading.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17584340

Citation

Carey, Nicola, et al. "Supplementary Nurse Prescribing for Patients With Skin Conditions: a National Questionnaire Survey." Journal of Clinical Nursing, vol. 16, no. 7, 2007, pp. 1230-7.
Carey N, Courtenay M, Burke J. Supplementary nurse prescribing for patients with skin conditions: a national questionnaire survey. J Clin Nurs. 2007;16(7):1230-7.
Carey, N., Courtenay, M., & Burke, J. (2007). Supplementary nurse prescribing for patients with skin conditions: a national questionnaire survey. Journal of Clinical Nursing, 16(7), 1230-7.
Carey N, Courtenay M, Burke J. Supplementary Nurse Prescribing for Patients With Skin Conditions: a National Questionnaire Survey. J Clin Nurs. 2007;16(7):1230-7. PubMed PMID: 17584340.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Supplementary nurse prescribing for patients with skin conditions: a national questionnaire survey. AU - Carey,Nicola, AU - Courtenay,Molly, AU - Burke,Joanna, PY - 2007/6/23/pubmed PY - 2007/8/3/medline PY - 2007/6/23/entrez SP - 1230 EP - 7 JF - Journal of clinical nursing JO - J Clin Nurs VL - 16 IS - 7 N2 - AIM: To examine the prescribing practices of supplementary nurse prescribers (working in both primary and secondary care) who prescribe medicines for patients with skin conditions and the factors that facilitate or inhibit this mode of prescribing. BACKGROUND: Nurses work in a variety of roles, with varying levels of expertise, are involved in the treatment management of a broad range of skin diseases. Skin conditions are those for which independent nurse prescribers prescribe most frequently. The role of the nurse, limitations of the formulary and inter-professional relationships influence the prescribing practices of these nurses. There is no evidence currently available examining the impact and activity of supplementary nurse prescribing for patients with skin conditions. METHODS: A convenient sample of 580 nurses who prescribed for skin conditions and were qualified supplementary nurse prescriber, self-completed a written questionnaire. RESULTS: Five hundred and twenty (89.7%) nurses were based in primary care and worked in general practice. Four hundred and thirty-six (75%) held a degree level qualification or higher, 41 (7%) had specialist dermatology training and 512 (88.3%) had more than 10 years postregistration nursing experience. Supplementary prescribing was used by a minority of nurses. Nurses who had specialist dermatology training used this mode of prescribing most frequently. Doctor and pharmacists lack of understanding of supplementary prescribing, lack of peer support and clinical management plans prevented the implementation of this mode of prescribing. CONCLUSIONS: Supplementary prescribing is used by a minority of nurses to treat skin conditions. A number of factors prevent nurses from using this mode of prescribing including lack of specialist training and lack of support in practice. RELEVANCE TO CLINICAL PRACTICE: Specialist dermatology training, an understanding of supplementary prescribing by the members of the healthcare team, and support in practice are required if supplementary prescribing is to be implemented effectively for the treatment of skin conditions. SN - 0962-1067 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17584340/Supplementary_nurse_prescribing_for_patients_with_skin_conditions:_a_national_questionnaire_survey_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -