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Relation of cognitive activity to risk of developing Alzheimer disease.
Neurology 2007; 69(20):1911-20Neur

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Frequent cognitive activity in old age has been associated with reduced risk of Alzheimer disease (AD), but the basis of the association is uncertain.

METHODS

More than 700 old people underwent annual clinical evaluations for up to 5 years. At baseline, they rated current and past frequency of cognitive activity with the current activity measure administered annually thereafter. Those who died underwent a uniform postmortem examination of the brain. Amyloid burden, density of tangles, and presence of Lewy bodies were assessed in eight brain regions and the number of chronic cerebral infarctions was noted.

RESULTS

During follow-up, 90 people developed AD. More frequent participation in cognitive activity was associated with reduced incidence of AD (HR = 0.58; 95% CI: 0.44, 0.77); a cognitively inactive person (score = 2.2, 10th percentile) was 2.6 times more likely to develop AD than a cognitively active person (score = 4.0, 90th percentile). The association remained after controlling for past cognitive activity, lifespan socioeconomic status, current social and physical activity, and low baseline cognitive function. Frequent cognitive activity was also associated with reduced incidence of mild cognitive impairment and less rapid decline in cognitive function. Among 102 persons who died and had a brain autopsy, neither global nor regionally specific measures of neuropathology were related to level of cognitive activity before the study, at study onset, or during the course of the study.

CONCLUSION

Level of cognitively stimulating activity in old age is related to risk of developing dementia.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Rush Alzheimer's Disease Center, Rush University Medical Center, 600 South Paulina, Suite 1038, Chicago, IL 60612, USA. rwilson@rush.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17596582

Citation

Wilson, R S., et al. "Relation of Cognitive Activity to Risk of Developing Alzheimer Disease." Neurology, vol. 69, no. 20, 2007, pp. 1911-20.
Wilson RS, Scherr PA, Schneider JA, et al. Relation of cognitive activity to risk of developing Alzheimer disease. Neurology. 2007;69(20):1911-20.
Wilson, R. S., Scherr, P. A., Schneider, J. A., Tang, Y., & Bennett, D. A. (2007). Relation of cognitive activity to risk of developing Alzheimer disease. Neurology, 69(20), pp. 1911-20.
Wilson RS, et al. Relation of Cognitive Activity to Risk of Developing Alzheimer Disease. Neurology. 2007 Nov 13;69(20):1911-20. PubMed PMID: 17596582.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Relation of cognitive activity to risk of developing Alzheimer disease. AU - Wilson,R S, AU - Scherr,P A, AU - Schneider,J A, AU - Tang,Y, AU - Bennett,D A, Y1 - 2007/06/27/ PY - 2007/6/29/pubmed PY - 2007/12/8/medline PY - 2007/6/29/entrez SP - 1911 EP - 20 JF - Neurology JO - Neurology VL - 69 IS - 20 N2 - BACKGROUND: Frequent cognitive activity in old age has been associated with reduced risk of Alzheimer disease (AD), but the basis of the association is uncertain. METHODS: More than 700 old people underwent annual clinical evaluations for up to 5 years. At baseline, they rated current and past frequency of cognitive activity with the current activity measure administered annually thereafter. Those who died underwent a uniform postmortem examination of the brain. Amyloid burden, density of tangles, and presence of Lewy bodies were assessed in eight brain regions and the number of chronic cerebral infarctions was noted. RESULTS: During follow-up, 90 people developed AD. More frequent participation in cognitive activity was associated with reduced incidence of AD (HR = 0.58; 95% CI: 0.44, 0.77); a cognitively inactive person (score = 2.2, 10th percentile) was 2.6 times more likely to develop AD than a cognitively active person (score = 4.0, 90th percentile). The association remained after controlling for past cognitive activity, lifespan socioeconomic status, current social and physical activity, and low baseline cognitive function. Frequent cognitive activity was also associated with reduced incidence of mild cognitive impairment and less rapid decline in cognitive function. Among 102 persons who died and had a brain autopsy, neither global nor regionally specific measures of neuropathology were related to level of cognitive activity before the study, at study onset, or during the course of the study. CONCLUSION: Level of cognitively stimulating activity in old age is related to risk of developing dementia. SN - 1526-632X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17596582/Relation_of_cognitive_activity_to_risk_of_developing_Alzheimer_disease_ L2 - http://www.neurology.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=17596582 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -