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Metabolic syndrome, its preeminent clusters, incident coronary heart disease and all-cause mortality--results of prospective analysis for the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study.
J Intern Med 2007; 262(1):113-22JI

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To investigate the prospective association between Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) and coronary heart disease (CHD) and all-cause mortality.

SUBJECTS AND DESIGN

A bi-racial cohort of 14 699 middle-aged Americans from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study were followed for the development of new CHD and death over a period of 9 years. MetS, using the original ATP-III criteria, was defined as having at least three of the following components: elevated blood pressure (BP), elevated plasma glucose, elevated blood triglyceride (TG), increased waist circumference, and low HDL cholesterol (HDL-c). Incident CHD cases included hospitalized myocardial infarction (MI), fatal CHD, revascularization procedures, and silent MI as detected by EKG.

RESULTS

The prevalence of the MetS at baseline was 29%, 30%, 40% and 26% among CHD-free white women, white men, black women, and black men, respectively. There were 1018 incident CHD cases and 1039 deaths. The relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of incident CHD associated with MetS was 2.46 (1.99, 3.03) for women and 1.86 (1.59, 2.18) for men. Clear dose-response relationship between the number of MetS components and incidence of CHD was found (P for linear trend <0.001). The following three clusters of MetS components posed the highest risk for CHD: (i) the elevated BP and glucose and low HDL-c group [RR = 5.68 (3.44, 9.37)]; (ii) the elevated BP and glucose and TG group [RR = 5.08 (2.96, 8.70)]; and (iii) the elevated BP and TG and low HDL-c group [RR = 3.98 (2.75, 5.77)]. When all five components co-existed, the risk was the highest [RR = 6.24 (4.65, 8.36)]. Similar results with attenuated RR were found for all-cause mortality.

CONCLUSIONS

Individuals, especially women, with the MetS have significantly higher risk of developing CHD. The riskiest combination is high-BP and glucose clustered with low HDL-c or high TG. These data highlight the importance of targeting MetS in the prevention of CHD and premature death.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Health Evaluation Sciences, Pennsylvania State University College of Medicine, Hershey, PA 17033, USA. yhong@psu.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17598819

Citation

Hong, Y, et al. "Metabolic Syndrome, Its Preeminent Clusters, Incident Coronary Heart Disease and All-cause Mortality--results of Prospective Analysis for the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study." Journal of Internal Medicine, vol. 262, no. 1, 2007, pp. 113-22.
Hong Y, Jin X, Mo J, et al. Metabolic syndrome, its preeminent clusters, incident coronary heart disease and all-cause mortality--results of prospective analysis for the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study. J Intern Med. 2007;262(1):113-22.
Hong, Y., Jin, X., Mo, J., Lin, H. M., Duan, Y., Pu, M., ... Liao, D. (2007). Metabolic syndrome, its preeminent clusters, incident coronary heart disease and all-cause mortality--results of prospective analysis for the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study. Journal of Internal Medicine, 262(1), pp. 113-22.
Hong Y, et al. Metabolic Syndrome, Its Preeminent Clusters, Incident Coronary Heart Disease and All-cause Mortality--results of Prospective Analysis for the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study. J Intern Med. 2007;262(1):113-22. PubMed PMID: 17598819.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Metabolic syndrome, its preeminent clusters, incident coronary heart disease and all-cause mortality--results of prospective analysis for the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study. AU - Hong,Y, AU - Jin,X, AU - Mo,J, AU - Lin,H-M, AU - Duan,Y, AU - Pu,M, AU - Wolbrette,D L, AU - Liao,D, PY - 2007/6/30/pubmed PY - 2007/8/19/medline PY - 2007/6/30/entrez SP - 113 EP - 22 JF - Journal of internal medicine JO - J. Intern. Med. VL - 262 IS - 1 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To investigate the prospective association between Metabolic Syndrome (MetS) and coronary heart disease (CHD) and all-cause mortality. SUBJECTS AND DESIGN: A bi-racial cohort of 14 699 middle-aged Americans from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities study were followed for the development of new CHD and death over a period of 9 years. MetS, using the original ATP-III criteria, was defined as having at least three of the following components: elevated blood pressure (BP), elevated plasma glucose, elevated blood triglyceride (TG), increased waist circumference, and low HDL cholesterol (HDL-c). Incident CHD cases included hospitalized myocardial infarction (MI), fatal CHD, revascularization procedures, and silent MI as detected by EKG. RESULTS: The prevalence of the MetS at baseline was 29%, 30%, 40% and 26% among CHD-free white women, white men, black women, and black men, respectively. There were 1018 incident CHD cases and 1039 deaths. The relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) of incident CHD associated with MetS was 2.46 (1.99, 3.03) for women and 1.86 (1.59, 2.18) for men. Clear dose-response relationship between the number of MetS components and incidence of CHD was found (P for linear trend <0.001). The following three clusters of MetS components posed the highest risk for CHD: (i) the elevated BP and glucose and low HDL-c group [RR = 5.68 (3.44, 9.37)]; (ii) the elevated BP and glucose and TG group [RR = 5.08 (2.96, 8.70)]; and (iii) the elevated BP and TG and low HDL-c group [RR = 3.98 (2.75, 5.77)]. When all five components co-existed, the risk was the highest [RR = 6.24 (4.65, 8.36)]. Similar results with attenuated RR were found for all-cause mortality. CONCLUSIONS: Individuals, especially women, with the MetS have significantly higher risk of developing CHD. The riskiest combination is high-BP and glucose clustered with low HDL-c or high TG. These data highlight the importance of targeting MetS in the prevention of CHD and premature death. SN - 0954-6820 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17598819/Metabolic_syndrome_its_preeminent_clusters_incident_coronary_heart_disease_and_all_cause_mortality__results_of_prospective_analysis_for_the_Atherosclerosis_Risk_in_Communities_study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2796.2007.01781.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -