Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Small dose spinal bupivacaine for Cesarean delivery does not reduce hypotension but accelerates motor recovery.
Can J Anaesth. 2007 Jul; 54(7):531-7.CJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Maternal hypotension occurs in 60-94% of Cesarean deliveries with 10-15 mg spinal bupivacaine. Reduced doses of bupivacaine may decrease the incidence of hypotension, nausea, and vasopressor use. The primary objective of this study was to compare 4.5 mg and 12 mg doses of intrathecal bupivacaine on maternal hemodynamics. The secondary objective was to determine if anticipated reductions in side effects were reflected in increased patient satisfaction.

METHODS

Following Research Ethics Board approval and informed consent 52 term parturients undergoing elective Cesarean delivery were randomly assigned to isobaric bupivacaine 4.5 mg or hyperbaric bupivacaine 12 mg for spinal anesthesia. All patients received fentanyl 50 microg and morphine 200 microg intrathecally. Intravenous fluid and vasopressor administration were standardized. Maternal hemodynamics, and sensorimotor levels were recorded at regular intervals. Side effects and patient satisfaction were documented.

RESULTS

Median cepahalad sensory block was C8 in both groups (NS) but the intensity of motor block was significantly less (P < 0.001) and of shorter duration (P < 0.001) with bupivacaine 4.5 mg. The proportion of patients requiring ephedrine (> 70%) and the quantities of ephedrine used were similar in both groups (NS). Use of supplemental analgesia, side effects, and measures of patient satisfaction were comparable in both groups.

DISCUSSION

Intrathecal bupivacaine 4.5 and 12 mg yielded similar sensory block and side effects during Cesarean delivery. Patients receiving 4.5 mg did, however, experience significantly less motor blockade of shorter duration.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Anesthesiology, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. glbryson@ohri.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17602038

Citation

Bryson, Gregory L., et al. "Small Dose Spinal Bupivacaine for Cesarean Delivery Does Not Reduce Hypotension but Accelerates Motor Recovery." Canadian Journal of Anaesthesia = Journal Canadien D'anesthesie, vol. 54, no. 7, 2007, pp. 531-7.
Bryson GL, Macneil R, Jeyaraj LM, et al. Small dose spinal bupivacaine for Cesarean delivery does not reduce hypotension but accelerates motor recovery. Can J Anaesth. 2007;54(7):531-7.
Bryson, G. L., Macneil, R., Jeyaraj, L. M., & Rosaeg, O. P. (2007). Small dose spinal bupivacaine for Cesarean delivery does not reduce hypotension but accelerates motor recovery. Canadian Journal of Anaesthesia = Journal Canadien D'anesthesie, 54(7), 531-7.
Bryson GL, et al. Small Dose Spinal Bupivacaine for Cesarean Delivery Does Not Reduce Hypotension but Accelerates Motor Recovery. Can J Anaesth. 2007;54(7):531-7. PubMed PMID: 17602038.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Small dose spinal bupivacaine for Cesarean delivery does not reduce hypotension but accelerates motor recovery. AU - Bryson,Gregory L, AU - Macneil,Robert, AU - Jeyaraj,Leo M, AU - Rosaeg,Ola P, PY - 2007/7/3/pubmed PY - 2007/8/29/medline PY - 2007/7/3/entrez SP - 531 EP - 7 JF - Canadian journal of anaesthesia = Journal canadien d'anesthesie JO - Can J Anaesth VL - 54 IS - 7 N2 - BACKGROUND: Maternal hypotension occurs in 60-94% of Cesarean deliveries with 10-15 mg spinal bupivacaine. Reduced doses of bupivacaine may decrease the incidence of hypotension, nausea, and vasopressor use. The primary objective of this study was to compare 4.5 mg and 12 mg doses of intrathecal bupivacaine on maternal hemodynamics. The secondary objective was to determine if anticipated reductions in side effects were reflected in increased patient satisfaction. METHODS: Following Research Ethics Board approval and informed consent 52 term parturients undergoing elective Cesarean delivery were randomly assigned to isobaric bupivacaine 4.5 mg or hyperbaric bupivacaine 12 mg for spinal anesthesia. All patients received fentanyl 50 microg and morphine 200 microg intrathecally. Intravenous fluid and vasopressor administration were standardized. Maternal hemodynamics, and sensorimotor levels were recorded at regular intervals. Side effects and patient satisfaction were documented. RESULTS: Median cepahalad sensory block was C8 in both groups (NS) but the intensity of motor block was significantly less (P < 0.001) and of shorter duration (P < 0.001) with bupivacaine 4.5 mg. The proportion of patients requiring ephedrine (> 70%) and the quantities of ephedrine used were similar in both groups (NS). Use of supplemental analgesia, side effects, and measures of patient satisfaction were comparable in both groups. DISCUSSION: Intrathecal bupivacaine 4.5 and 12 mg yielded similar sensory block and side effects during Cesarean delivery. Patients receiving 4.5 mg did, however, experience significantly less motor blockade of shorter duration. SN - 0832-610X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17602038/Small_dose_spinal_bupivacaine_for_Cesarean_delivery_does_not_reduce_hypotension_but_accelerates_motor_recovery_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/BF03022316 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -