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Longitudinal assessment of micronutrient intake among African-American and white girls: The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Growth and Health Study.
J Am Diet Assoc. 2007 Jul; 107(7):1113-23.JA

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Low intakes of micronutrients among adolescents may be linked to long-term health risks, especially in African-American girls. This report describes intake of key micronutrients relative to the Dietary Reference Intakes in a sample of African-American and white girls.

DESIGN

Longitudinal analyses used data from 3-day food records collected in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Growth and Health Study.

SUBJECTS/SETTING

Subjects included 1,166 white and 1,213 African-American girls (aged 9 to 18 years).

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Estimated usual daily intakes of vitamins A, E, C, D, B-6, B-12, magnesium, folate, calcium, and zinc were compared to the Adequate Intake (for vitamin D and calcium) or the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) (all other micronutrients).

STATISTICAL ANALYSES PERFORMED

Usual daily intake of each micronutrient was estimated. For nutrients with an EAR, the EAR cut-point method was used to assess the prevalence of low nutrient intakes. Mixed models were used to identify age and racial differences in usual daily intake of each nutrient.

RESULTS

African-American girls consumed less vitamin A and D, calcium, and magnesium compared to white girls. Regardless of race, a substantial percentage of girls had intakes below the EAR: vitamin E (81.2% to 99.0%), magnesium (24.0% to 94.5%), folate (46.0% to 87.3%). Intakes of vitamins A, D, and C; calcium; and magnesium decreased across years. As girls aged, there was an increasing proportion with intakes below the EAR for vitamins A, C, B-6, and B-12.

CONCLUSIONS

Food and nutrition professionals should continue to educate adolescent girls, especially those who are African American, about the importance of a nutrient-dense diet for optimum health.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition, Saint Joseph College, West Hartford, CT, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17604740

Citation

Affenito, Sandra G., et al. "Longitudinal Assessment of Micronutrient Intake Among African-American and White Girls: the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Growth and Health Study." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 107, no. 7, 2007, pp. 1113-23.
Affenito SG, Thompson DR, Franko DL, et al. Longitudinal assessment of micronutrient intake among African-American and white girls: The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Growth and Health Study. J Am Diet Assoc. 2007;107(7):1113-23.
Affenito, S. G., Thompson, D. R., Franko, D. L., Striegel-Moore, R. H., Daniels, S. R., Barton, B. A., Schreiber, G. B., Schmidt, M., & Crawford, P. B. (2007). Longitudinal assessment of micronutrient intake among African-American and white girls: The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Growth and Health Study. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 107(7), 1113-23.
Affenito SG, et al. Longitudinal Assessment of Micronutrient Intake Among African-American and White Girls: the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Growth and Health Study. J Am Diet Assoc. 2007;107(7):1113-23. PubMed PMID: 17604740.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Longitudinal assessment of micronutrient intake among African-American and white girls: The National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Growth and Health Study. AU - Affenito,Sandra G, AU - Thompson,Douglas R, AU - Franko,Debra L, AU - Striegel-Moore,Ruth H, AU - Daniels,Stephen R, AU - Barton,Bruce A, AU - Schreiber,George B, AU - Schmidt,Marcia, AU - Crawford,Patricia B, PY - 2005/08/14/received PY - 2007/7/3/pubmed PY - 2007/9/7/medline PY - 2007/7/3/entrez SP - 1113 EP - 23 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 107 IS - 7 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Low intakes of micronutrients among adolescents may be linked to long-term health risks, especially in African-American girls. This report describes intake of key micronutrients relative to the Dietary Reference Intakes in a sample of African-American and white girls. DESIGN: Longitudinal analyses used data from 3-day food records collected in the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Growth and Health Study. SUBJECTS/SETTING: Subjects included 1,166 white and 1,213 African-American girls (aged 9 to 18 years). MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Estimated usual daily intakes of vitamins A, E, C, D, B-6, B-12, magnesium, folate, calcium, and zinc were compared to the Adequate Intake (for vitamin D and calcium) or the Estimated Average Requirement (EAR) (all other micronutrients). STATISTICAL ANALYSES PERFORMED: Usual daily intake of each micronutrient was estimated. For nutrients with an EAR, the EAR cut-point method was used to assess the prevalence of low nutrient intakes. Mixed models were used to identify age and racial differences in usual daily intake of each nutrient. RESULTS: African-American girls consumed less vitamin A and D, calcium, and magnesium compared to white girls. Regardless of race, a substantial percentage of girls had intakes below the EAR: vitamin E (81.2% to 99.0%), magnesium (24.0% to 94.5%), folate (46.0% to 87.3%). Intakes of vitamins A, D, and C; calcium; and magnesium decreased across years. As girls aged, there was an increasing proportion with intakes below the EAR for vitamins A, C, B-6, and B-12. CONCLUSIONS: Food and nutrition professionals should continue to educate adolescent girls, especially those who are African American, about the importance of a nutrient-dense diet for optimum health. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17604740/Longitudinal_assessment_of_micronutrient_intake_among_African_American_and_white_girls:_The_National_Heart_Lung_and_Blood_Institute_Growth_and_Health_Study_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -