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Demand-withdraw communication in severely distressed, moderately distressed, and nondistressed couples: rigidity and polarity during relationship and personal problem discussions.
J Fam Psychol. 2007 Jun; 21(2):218-26.JF

Abstract

This study investigated demand-withdraw communication among 68 severely distressed couples seeking therapy, 66 moderately distressed couples seeking therapy, and 48 nondistressed couples. Self-report and videotaped discussions replicated previous research, demonstrating that greater demand-withdraw during relationship problem discussions was associated with greater distress and that overall, wife-demand/husband-withdraw was greater than husband-demand/wife-withdraw. Results extended the conflict structure view of demand-withdraw by indicating that this gender polarity in demand-withdraw roles varied in strength and direction depending on who chose the topic for discussion, distress level, and marriage length. Further, in videotaped personal problem discussions, typical gender patterns of demand-withdraw were reversed. Across the relationship and personal problem discussions, a pattern of gender polarity emerged when husbands held the burden of changing.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Graduate School of Education and Psychology, Pepperdine University, Malibu, CA 90263-4608, USA. kathleen.eldridge@pepperdine.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17605544

Citation

Eldridge, Kathleen A., et al. "Demand-withdraw Communication in Severely Distressed, Moderately Distressed, and Nondistressed Couples: Rigidity and Polarity During Relationship and Personal Problem Discussions." Journal of Family Psychology : JFP : Journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43), vol. 21, no. 2, 2007, pp. 218-26.
Eldridge KA, Sevier M, Jones J, et al. Demand-withdraw communication in severely distressed, moderately distressed, and nondistressed couples: rigidity and polarity during relationship and personal problem discussions. J Fam Psychol. 2007;21(2):218-26.
Eldridge, K. A., Sevier, M., Jones, J., Atkins, D. C., & Christensen, A. (2007). Demand-withdraw communication in severely distressed, moderately distressed, and nondistressed couples: rigidity and polarity during relationship and personal problem discussions. Journal of Family Psychology : JFP : Journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43), 21(2), 218-26.
Eldridge KA, et al. Demand-withdraw Communication in Severely Distressed, Moderately Distressed, and Nondistressed Couples: Rigidity and Polarity During Relationship and Personal Problem Discussions. J Fam Psychol. 2007;21(2):218-26. PubMed PMID: 17605544.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Demand-withdraw communication in severely distressed, moderately distressed, and nondistressed couples: rigidity and polarity during relationship and personal problem discussions. AU - Eldridge,Kathleen A, AU - Sevier,Mia, AU - Jones,Janice, AU - Atkins,David C, AU - Christensen,Andrew, PY - 2007/7/4/pubmed PY - 2007/9/7/medline PY - 2007/7/4/entrez SP - 218 EP - 26 JF - Journal of family psychology : JFP : journal of the Division of Family Psychology of the American Psychological Association (Division 43) JO - J Fam Psychol VL - 21 IS - 2 N2 - This study investigated demand-withdraw communication among 68 severely distressed couples seeking therapy, 66 moderately distressed couples seeking therapy, and 48 nondistressed couples. Self-report and videotaped discussions replicated previous research, demonstrating that greater demand-withdraw during relationship problem discussions was associated with greater distress and that overall, wife-demand/husband-withdraw was greater than husband-demand/wife-withdraw. Results extended the conflict structure view of demand-withdraw by indicating that this gender polarity in demand-withdraw roles varied in strength and direction depending on who chose the topic for discussion, distress level, and marriage length. Further, in videotaped personal problem discussions, typical gender patterns of demand-withdraw were reversed. Across the relationship and personal problem discussions, a pattern of gender polarity emerged when husbands held the burden of changing. SN - 0893-3200 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17605544/Demand_withdraw_communication_in_severely_distressed_moderately_distressed_and_nondistressed_couples:_rigidity_and_polarity_during_relationship_and_personal_problem_discussions_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -