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Vitamin and mineral supplements in pregnancy and the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: a case-control study.
BMC Public Health. 2007 Jul 03; 7:136.BP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

An earlier case-control study from Western Australia reported a protective effect of maternal folic acid supplementation during pregnancy on the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). The present study tested that association.

METHODS

A national case-control study was conducted in New Zealand. The mothers of 97 children with ALL and of 303 controls were asked about vitamin and mineral supplements taken during pregnancy.

RESULTS

There was no association between reported folate intake during pregnancy and childhood ALL (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.1, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.5-2.7). Combining our results with the study from Western Australia and another study from Québec in a meta-analysis gave a summary OR of 0.9 (95% CI 0.8-1.1).

CONCLUSION

Our own study, of similar size to the Australian study, does not support the hypothesis of a protective effect of folate on childhood ALL. Neither do the findings of the meta-analysis.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Preventive and Social Medicine, University of Otago, Dunedin, New Zealand. john.dockerty@stonebow.otago.ac.nzNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17605825

Citation

Dockerty, John D., et al. "Vitamin and Mineral Supplements in Pregnancy and the Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia: a Case-control Study." BMC Public Health, vol. 7, 2007, p. 136.
Dockerty JD, Herbison P, Skegg DC, et al. Vitamin and mineral supplements in pregnancy and the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: a case-control study. BMC Public Health. 2007;7:136.
Dockerty, J. D., Herbison, P., Skegg, D. C., & Elwood, M. (2007). Vitamin and mineral supplements in pregnancy and the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: a case-control study. BMC Public Health, 7, 136.
Dockerty JD, et al. Vitamin and Mineral Supplements in Pregnancy and the Risk of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukaemia: a Case-control Study. BMC Public Health. 2007 Jul 3;7:136. PubMed PMID: 17605825.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Vitamin and mineral supplements in pregnancy and the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia: a case-control study. AU - Dockerty,John D, AU - Herbison,Peter, AU - Skegg,David C G, AU - Elwood,Mark, Y1 - 2007/07/03/ PY - 2006/09/08/received PY - 2007/07/03/accepted PY - 2007/7/4/pubmed PY - 2007/8/31/medline PY - 2007/7/4/entrez SP - 136 EP - 136 JF - BMC public health JO - BMC Public Health VL - 7 N2 - BACKGROUND: An earlier case-control study from Western Australia reported a protective effect of maternal folic acid supplementation during pregnancy on the risk of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). The present study tested that association. METHODS: A national case-control study was conducted in New Zealand. The mothers of 97 children with ALL and of 303 controls were asked about vitamin and mineral supplements taken during pregnancy. RESULTS: There was no association between reported folate intake during pregnancy and childhood ALL (adjusted odds ratio (OR) 1.1, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.5-2.7). Combining our results with the study from Western Australia and another study from Québec in a meta-analysis gave a summary OR of 0.9 (95% CI 0.8-1.1). CONCLUSION: Our own study, of similar size to the Australian study, does not support the hypothesis of a protective effect of folate on childhood ALL. Neither do the findings of the meta-analysis. SN - 1471-2458 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17605825/Vitamin_and_mineral_supplements_in_pregnancy_and_the_risk_of_childhood_acute_lymphoblastic_leukaemia:_a_case_control_study_ L2 - https://bmcpublichealth.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/1471-2458-7-136 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -