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Increasing the fat-to-carbohydrate ratio in a high-fat diet prevents the development of obesity but not a prediabetic state in rats.
Clin Sci (Lond). 2007 Nov; 113(10):417-25.CS

Abstract

Metabolic disorders induced by high-fat feeding in rodents evoke some, if not all, of the features of human metabolic syndrome. The occurrence and severity of metabolic disorders, however, varies according to rodent species, and even strain, as well as the diet. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the long-term obesogenic and diabetogenic effects of three high-fat diets differing by their fat/carbohydrate ratios. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a control high-carbohydrate and low-fat diet [HCD; 3:16:6 ratio of fat/carbohydrate/protein; 15.48 kJ/g (3.7 kcal/g)], a high-fat and medium-carbohydrate diet [HFD1; 53:30:17 ratio of fat/carbohydrate/protein; 19.66 kJ/g (4.7 kcal/g)], a very-high-fat and low-carbohydrate diet [HFD2; 67:9:24 ratio of fat/carbohydrate/protein; 21.76 kJ/g (5.2 kcal/g)] or a very-high-fat and carbohydrate-free diet [HFD3; 75:0:25 ratio of fat/carbohydrate/protein; 24.69 kJ/g (5.9 kcal/g)] for 10 weeks. Compared with the control diet (HCD), rats fed with high-fat combined with more (HFD1) or less (HFD2) carbohydrate exhibited higher BMI (body mass index; +13 and +10% respectively; P<0.05) and abdominal fat (+70% in both HFD1 and HFD2; P<0.05), higher plasma leptin (+130 and +135% respectively; P<0.05), lower plasma adiponectin levels (-23 and -30% respectively; P<0.05) and impaired glucose tolerance. Only the HFD1 group had insulin resistance. By contrast, a very-high-fat diet devoid of carbohydrate (HFD3) led to impaired glucose tolerance, insulin resistance and hypoadiponectinaemia (-50%; P<0.05), whereas BMI, adiposity and plasma leptin did not differ from respective values in animals fed the control diet. We conclude that increasing the fat-to-carbohydrate ratio to the uppermost (i.e. carbohydrate-free) in a high-fat diet prevents the development of obesity, but not the prediabetic state (i.e. altered glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity).

Authors+Show Affiliations

Département de Neurobiologie des Rythmes, Institut de Neurosciences Cellulaires et Intégratives, CNRS, Université Louis Pasteur, 5 rue Blaise pascal, 67084 Strasbourg, France.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17608620

Citation

Sinitskaya, Natalia, et al. "Increasing the Fat-to-carbohydrate Ratio in a High-fat Diet Prevents the Development of Obesity but Not a Prediabetic State in Rats." Clinical Science (London, England : 1979), vol. 113, no. 10, 2007, pp. 417-25.
Sinitskaya N, Gourmelen S, Schuster-Klein C, et al. Increasing the fat-to-carbohydrate ratio in a high-fat diet prevents the development of obesity but not a prediabetic state in rats. Clin Sci. 2007;113(10):417-25.
Sinitskaya, N., Gourmelen, S., Schuster-Klein, C., Guardiola-Lemaitre, B., Pévet, P., & Challet, E. (2007). Increasing the fat-to-carbohydrate ratio in a high-fat diet prevents the development of obesity but not a prediabetic state in rats. Clinical Science (London, England : 1979), 113(10), 417-25.
Sinitskaya N, et al. Increasing the Fat-to-carbohydrate Ratio in a High-fat Diet Prevents the Development of Obesity but Not a Prediabetic State in Rats. Clin Sci. 2007;113(10):417-25. PubMed PMID: 17608620.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Increasing the fat-to-carbohydrate ratio in a high-fat diet prevents the development of obesity but not a prediabetic state in rats. AU - Sinitskaya,Natalia, AU - Gourmelen,Sylviane, AU - Schuster-Klein,Carole, AU - Guardiola-Lemaitre,Béatrice, AU - Pévet,Paul, AU - Challet,Etienne, PY - 2007/7/5/pubmed PY - 2007/12/7/medline PY - 2007/7/5/entrez SP - 417 EP - 25 JF - Clinical science (London, England : 1979) JO - Clin. Sci. VL - 113 IS - 10 N2 - Metabolic disorders induced by high-fat feeding in rodents evoke some, if not all, of the features of human metabolic syndrome. The occurrence and severity of metabolic disorders, however, varies according to rodent species, and even strain, as well as the diet. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the long-term obesogenic and diabetogenic effects of three high-fat diets differing by their fat/carbohydrate ratios. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed a control high-carbohydrate and low-fat diet [HCD; 3:16:6 ratio of fat/carbohydrate/protein; 15.48 kJ/g (3.7 kcal/g)], a high-fat and medium-carbohydrate diet [HFD1; 53:30:17 ratio of fat/carbohydrate/protein; 19.66 kJ/g (4.7 kcal/g)], a very-high-fat and low-carbohydrate diet [HFD2; 67:9:24 ratio of fat/carbohydrate/protein; 21.76 kJ/g (5.2 kcal/g)] or a very-high-fat and carbohydrate-free diet [HFD3; 75:0:25 ratio of fat/carbohydrate/protein; 24.69 kJ/g (5.9 kcal/g)] for 10 weeks. Compared with the control diet (HCD), rats fed with high-fat combined with more (HFD1) or less (HFD2) carbohydrate exhibited higher BMI (body mass index; +13 and +10% respectively; P<0.05) and abdominal fat (+70% in both HFD1 and HFD2; P<0.05), higher plasma leptin (+130 and +135% respectively; P<0.05), lower plasma adiponectin levels (-23 and -30% respectively; P<0.05) and impaired glucose tolerance. Only the HFD1 group had insulin resistance. By contrast, a very-high-fat diet devoid of carbohydrate (HFD3) led to impaired glucose tolerance, insulin resistance and hypoadiponectinaemia (-50%; P<0.05), whereas BMI, adiposity and plasma leptin did not differ from respective values in animals fed the control diet. We conclude that increasing the fat-to-carbohydrate ratio to the uppermost (i.e. carbohydrate-free) in a high-fat diet prevents the development of obesity, but not the prediabetic state (i.e. altered glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity). SN - 1470-8736 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17608620/Increasing_the_fat_to_carbohydrate_ratio_in_a_high_fat_diet_prevents_the_development_of_obesity_but_not_a_prediabetic_state_in_rats_ L2 - https://portlandpress.com/clinsci/article-lookup/doi/10.1042/CS20070182 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -