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Longitudinal study of veterinary students and veterinarians: effects of growing up on a farm with animals.
Aust Vet J. 2007 Jul; 85(7):296-9.AV

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To compare the career paths of veterinarians who had grown up on farms with animals with those of veterinarians from other backgrounds, during the first 15 years after they graduated.

PROCEDURE

Questionnaires were completed by veterinary students in their first and fifth year, and after 1, 5, 10 and 15 years after they graduated. The most recent questionnaires were returned by 134 of 137 graduates, 20% of whom had grown up, or lived for at least two years, on farms where animals were a primary source of income. This paper includes findings from that questionnaire but also contains comparisons with previous ones.

RESULTS

Fifteen years after they graduated, veterinarians who had grown up on farms with animals were more likely than those of other backgrounds to be living in centres with < 10,000 people (58% farm, 20% other), irrespective of the type of work they were doing. Although they were more likely to be doing no veterinary work (42% farm, 21% other), they were also more likely to be working in mixed practice (15% farm, 9% other) and with cattle and sheep generally (11% full time equivalent farm, 5% full time equivalent other). However, > 80% of those who had started their careers in mixed practice were no longer in mixed practice after 15 years. Veterinarians of farm origin who were in private practice were more likely to be sole or part owners (93% farm, 46% other) and less likely to be employees (7% farm, 54% other).

CONCLUSIONS

In this study, veterinarians who had grown up on farms with animals seemed slightly more likely than those from other backgrounds to continue working in mixed practice and to work with cattle or sheep, although the numbers were small and the differences not significant. Whatever their background, the majority who started their careers in mixed practice left over the next few years, and by 15 years only 15% remained.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Surveyingtheprofessions, 11 Sixth Avenue, St Lucia QLD 4067, Australia. trevorhealth@aapt.net.au

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17615044

Citation

Heath, T J.. "Longitudinal Study of Veterinary Students and Veterinarians: Effects of Growing Up On a Farm With Animals." Australian Veterinary Journal, vol. 85, no. 7, 2007, pp. 296-9.
Heath TJ. Longitudinal study of veterinary students and veterinarians: effects of growing up on a farm with animals. Aust Vet J. 2007;85(7):296-9.
Heath, T. J. (2007). Longitudinal study of veterinary students and veterinarians: effects of growing up on a farm with animals. Australian Veterinary Journal, 85(7), 296-9.
Heath TJ. Longitudinal Study of Veterinary Students and Veterinarians: Effects of Growing Up On a Farm With Animals. Aust Vet J. 2007;85(7):296-9. PubMed PMID: 17615044.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Longitudinal study of veterinary students and veterinarians: effects of growing up on a farm with animals. A1 - Heath,T J, PY - 2007/7/7/pubmed PY - 2007/9/5/medline PY - 2007/7/7/entrez SP - 296 EP - 9 JF - Australian veterinary journal JO - Aust Vet J VL - 85 IS - 7 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To compare the career paths of veterinarians who had grown up on farms with animals with those of veterinarians from other backgrounds, during the first 15 years after they graduated. PROCEDURE: Questionnaires were completed by veterinary students in their first and fifth year, and after 1, 5, 10 and 15 years after they graduated. The most recent questionnaires were returned by 134 of 137 graduates, 20% of whom had grown up, or lived for at least two years, on farms where animals were a primary source of income. This paper includes findings from that questionnaire but also contains comparisons with previous ones. RESULTS: Fifteen years after they graduated, veterinarians who had grown up on farms with animals were more likely than those of other backgrounds to be living in centres with < 10,000 people (58% farm, 20% other), irrespective of the type of work they were doing. Although they were more likely to be doing no veterinary work (42% farm, 21% other), they were also more likely to be working in mixed practice (15% farm, 9% other) and with cattle and sheep generally (11% full time equivalent farm, 5% full time equivalent other). However, > 80% of those who had started their careers in mixed practice were no longer in mixed practice after 15 years. Veterinarians of farm origin who were in private practice were more likely to be sole or part owners (93% farm, 46% other) and less likely to be employees (7% farm, 54% other). CONCLUSIONS: In this study, veterinarians who had grown up on farms with animals seemed slightly more likely than those from other backgrounds to continue working in mixed practice and to work with cattle or sheep, although the numbers were small and the differences not significant. Whatever their background, the majority who started their careers in mixed practice left over the next few years, and by 15 years only 15% remained. SN - 0005-0423 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17615044/Longitudinal_study_of_veterinary_students_and_veterinarians:_effects_of_growing_up_on_a_farm_with_animals_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1751-0813.2007.00171.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -