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Lack of evidence for effect modification by estrogen of association between body mass index and colorectal cancer risk among postmenopausal women.
Cancer Causes Control 2007; 18(8):793-9CC

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

Previous studies of the association between body mass index (BMI) and colorectal cancer among women found increased risk only among women who were premenopausal or used hormone replacement therapy (HRT). These results led to the hypothesis that BMI may increase risk more strongly among women with higher levels of circulating estrogen. We examined the association between BMI and colorectal cancer incidence by use of HRT, and number of postmenopausal years without HRT, a measure of duration of exposure to lower levels of estrogen.

METHODS

During follow-up from 1992-2003, 814 incident colorectal cancer cases were identified among 73,842 postmenopausal women in the Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort. Information on BMI and other risk factors was obtained from questionnaires completed at enrollment in 1992-1993 and during follow-up. Hazard ratios were calculated using proportional hazards modeling.

RESULTS

The association between BMI and colorectal cancer incidence was similar among never-users of HRT (hazard ratio 1.13, 95% confidence interval 1.02-1.25 per 5-unit increase in BMI) and current-users of HRT (hazard ratio 1.08, 95% confidence interval 0.92-1.27 per 5-unit increase in BMI). Among women not currently using HRT, the association between BMI and colorectal cancer did not differ by postmenopausal years without HRT.

CONCLUSIONS

Our results do not support the hypothesis that BMI increases risk of colorectal cancer more strongly among women with higher levels of estrogen.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Epidemiology and Surveillance Research, American Cancer Society, Clifton Road NE, Atlanta, GA 1599, USA. yiting.wang@cancer.orgNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17619155

Citation

Wang, Yiting, et al. "Lack of Evidence for Effect Modification By Estrogen of Association Between Body Mass Index and Colorectal Cancer Risk Among Postmenopausal Women." Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, vol. 18, no. 8, 2007, pp. 793-9.
Wang Y, Jacobs EJ, Teras LR, et al. Lack of evidence for effect modification by estrogen of association between body mass index and colorectal cancer risk among postmenopausal women. Cancer Causes Control. 2007;18(8):793-9.
Wang, Y., Jacobs, E. J., Teras, L. R., Pavluck, A. L., Rodriguez, C., Thun, M. J., & Calle, E. E. (2007). Lack of evidence for effect modification by estrogen of association between body mass index and colorectal cancer risk among postmenopausal women. Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, 18(8), pp. 793-9.
Wang Y, et al. Lack of Evidence for Effect Modification By Estrogen of Association Between Body Mass Index and Colorectal Cancer Risk Among Postmenopausal Women. Cancer Causes Control. 2007;18(8):793-9. PubMed PMID: 17619155.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Lack of evidence for effect modification by estrogen of association between body mass index and colorectal cancer risk among postmenopausal women. AU - Wang,Yiting, AU - Jacobs,Eric J, AU - Teras,Lauren R, AU - Pavluck,Alexandre L, AU - Rodriguez,Carmen, AU - Thun,Michael J, AU - Calle,Eugenia E, Y1 - 2007/07/06/ PY - 2007/01/03/received PY - 2007/03/30/accepted PY - 2007/7/10/pubmed PY - 2007/10/10/medline PY - 2007/7/10/entrez SP - 793 EP - 9 JF - Cancer causes & control : CCC JO - Cancer Causes Control VL - 18 IS - 8 N2 - OBJECTIVE: Previous studies of the association between body mass index (BMI) and colorectal cancer among women found increased risk only among women who were premenopausal or used hormone replacement therapy (HRT). These results led to the hypothesis that BMI may increase risk more strongly among women with higher levels of circulating estrogen. We examined the association between BMI and colorectal cancer incidence by use of HRT, and number of postmenopausal years without HRT, a measure of duration of exposure to lower levels of estrogen. METHODS: During follow-up from 1992-2003, 814 incident colorectal cancer cases were identified among 73,842 postmenopausal women in the Cancer Prevention Study-II Nutrition Cohort. Information on BMI and other risk factors was obtained from questionnaires completed at enrollment in 1992-1993 and during follow-up. Hazard ratios were calculated using proportional hazards modeling. RESULTS: The association between BMI and colorectal cancer incidence was similar among never-users of HRT (hazard ratio 1.13, 95% confidence interval 1.02-1.25 per 5-unit increase in BMI) and current-users of HRT (hazard ratio 1.08, 95% confidence interval 0.92-1.27 per 5-unit increase in BMI). Among women not currently using HRT, the association between BMI and colorectal cancer did not differ by postmenopausal years without HRT. CONCLUSIONS: Our results do not support the hypothesis that BMI increases risk of colorectal cancer more strongly among women with higher levels of estrogen. SN - 0957-5243 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17619155/Lack_of_evidence_for_effect_modification_by_estrogen_of_association_between_body_mass_index_and_colorectal_cancer_risk_among_postmenopausal_women_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-007-9009-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -