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The role of negative affect intensity and the fear of emotions in posttraumatic stress symptom severity among victims of childhood interpersonal violence.
J Nerv Ment Dis. 2007 Jul; 195(7):580-7.JN

Abstract

Heightened negative affect (NA) intensity and the tendency to negatively evaluate emotions may be associated with the development and maintenance of posttraumatic stress symptoms. However, the specific role of these vulnerabilities has yet to be explored. Thus, this study was conducted to examine the influence of NA intensity and the fear of emotions in posttraumatic symptom severity among 102 childhood interpersonal violence victims. Fear of emotions significantly predicted posttraumatic symptom severity above and beyond NA intensity and NA. Findings suggest that posttraumatic outcomes may not be influenced by an underlying vulnerability of heightened NA intensity, but instead, are affected by the extent to which emotional responses are negatively evaluated. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for interventions and future research on posttraumatic responding.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychology, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742, USA. MTull@psyc.umd.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17632248

Citation

Tull, Matthew T., et al. "The Role of Negative Affect Intensity and the Fear of Emotions in Posttraumatic Stress Symptom Severity Among Victims of Childhood Interpersonal Violence." The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, vol. 195, no. 7, 2007, pp. 580-7.
Tull MT, Jakupcak M, McFadden ME, et al. The role of negative affect intensity and the fear of emotions in posttraumatic stress symptom severity among victims of childhood interpersonal violence. J Nerv Ment Dis. 2007;195(7):580-7.
Tull, M. T., Jakupcak, M., McFadden, M. E., & Roemer, L. (2007). The role of negative affect intensity and the fear of emotions in posttraumatic stress symptom severity among victims of childhood interpersonal violence. The Journal of Nervous and Mental Disease, 195(7), 580-7.
Tull MT, et al. The Role of Negative Affect Intensity and the Fear of Emotions in Posttraumatic Stress Symptom Severity Among Victims of Childhood Interpersonal Violence. J Nerv Ment Dis. 2007;195(7):580-7. PubMed PMID: 17632248.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The role of negative affect intensity and the fear of emotions in posttraumatic stress symptom severity among victims of childhood interpersonal violence. AU - Tull,Matthew T, AU - Jakupcak,Matthew, AU - McFadden,Megan E, AU - Roemer,Lizabeth, PY - 2007/7/17/pubmed PY - 2007/8/19/medline PY - 2007/7/17/entrez SP - 580 EP - 7 JF - The Journal of nervous and mental disease JO - J Nerv Ment Dis VL - 195 IS - 7 N2 - Heightened negative affect (NA) intensity and the tendency to negatively evaluate emotions may be associated with the development and maintenance of posttraumatic stress symptoms. However, the specific role of these vulnerabilities has yet to be explored. Thus, this study was conducted to examine the influence of NA intensity and the fear of emotions in posttraumatic symptom severity among 102 childhood interpersonal violence victims. Fear of emotions significantly predicted posttraumatic symptom severity above and beyond NA intensity and NA. Findings suggest that posttraumatic outcomes may not be influenced by an underlying vulnerability of heightened NA intensity, but instead, are affected by the extent to which emotional responses are negatively evaluated. Results are discussed in terms of their implications for interventions and future research on posttraumatic responding. SN - 0022-3018 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17632248/The_role_of_negative_affect_intensity_and_the_fear_of_emotions_in_posttraumatic_stress_symptom_severity_among_victims_of_childhood_interpersonal_violence_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/NMD.0b013e318093ed5f DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -