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Dietary patterns, Mediterranean diet, and endometrial cancer risk.
Cancer Causes Control 2007; 18(9):957-66CC

Abstract

This study examines the association between dietary patterns and endometrial cancer risk. A case-control study of endometrial cancer was conducted from 1996 to 1999 in the San Francisco Bay Area in white, African-American, and Latina women age 35-79. Dietary patterns were defined using a principal components analysis; scoring dietary intake based on correspondence to a Mediterranean-style diet; and by jointly categorizing intake of fruits/vegetables and dietary fat. Four dietary patterns were identified and labeled "plant-based," "western," "ethnic," and "phytoestrogen-rich." None of these dietary patterns nor adherence to a Mediterranean diet (to the extent consumed by this population) was associated with endometrial cancer risk. However, among non-users of supplements, greater consumption of the "western" dietary pattern was associated with a 60% increase in risk (95% CI: 0.95-2.7 per unit change; P-interaction = 0.10). A diet characterized by high fat consumption increased risk, regardless of fruit and vegetable consumption (OR = 1.4, 95% CI: 0.97-2.1 for high fat, low fruit/vegetable intake and OR = 1.4, 95% CI: 0.95-2.1 for high fat, high fruit/vegetable intake compared to low fat, high fruit/vegetable intake). Thus, while like others we found that dietary fat increases endometrial cancer risk, the evaluation of dietary patterns did not provide any additional information regarding risk.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Northern California Cancer Center, 2201 Walnut Avenue, Fremont, CA 94538, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17638105

Citation

Dalvi, Tapashi B., et al. "Dietary Patterns, Mediterranean Diet, and Endometrial Cancer Risk." Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, vol. 18, no. 9, 2007, pp. 957-66.
Dalvi TB, Canchola AJ, Horn-Ross PL. Dietary patterns, Mediterranean diet, and endometrial cancer risk. Cancer Causes Control. 2007;18(9):957-66.
Dalvi, T. B., Canchola, A. J., & Horn-Ross, P. L. (2007). Dietary patterns, Mediterranean diet, and endometrial cancer risk. Cancer Causes & Control : CCC, 18(9), pp. 957-66.
Dalvi TB, Canchola AJ, Horn-Ross PL. Dietary Patterns, Mediterranean Diet, and Endometrial Cancer Risk. Cancer Causes Control. 2007;18(9):957-66. PubMed PMID: 17638105.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary patterns, Mediterranean diet, and endometrial cancer risk. AU - Dalvi,Tapashi B, AU - Canchola,Alison J, AU - Horn-Ross,Pamela L, Y1 - 2007/07/19/ PY - 2007/02/12/received PY - 2007/06/27/accepted PY - 2007/7/20/pubmed PY - 2007/12/8/medline PY - 2007/7/20/entrez SP - 957 EP - 66 JF - Cancer causes & control : CCC JO - Cancer Causes Control VL - 18 IS - 9 N2 - This study examines the association between dietary patterns and endometrial cancer risk. A case-control study of endometrial cancer was conducted from 1996 to 1999 in the San Francisco Bay Area in white, African-American, and Latina women age 35-79. Dietary patterns were defined using a principal components analysis; scoring dietary intake based on correspondence to a Mediterranean-style diet; and by jointly categorizing intake of fruits/vegetables and dietary fat. Four dietary patterns were identified and labeled "plant-based," "western," "ethnic," and "phytoestrogen-rich." None of these dietary patterns nor adherence to a Mediterranean diet (to the extent consumed by this population) was associated with endometrial cancer risk. However, among non-users of supplements, greater consumption of the "western" dietary pattern was associated with a 60% increase in risk (95% CI: 0.95-2.7 per unit change; P-interaction = 0.10). A diet characterized by high fat consumption increased risk, regardless of fruit and vegetable consumption (OR = 1.4, 95% CI: 0.97-2.1 for high fat, low fruit/vegetable intake and OR = 1.4, 95% CI: 0.95-2.1 for high fat, high fruit/vegetable intake compared to low fat, high fruit/vegetable intake). Thus, while like others we found that dietary fat increases endometrial cancer risk, the evaluation of dietary patterns did not provide any additional information regarding risk. SN - 0957-5243 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17638105/Dietary_patterns_Mediterranean_diet_and_endometrial_cancer_risk_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10552-007-9037-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -