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The value of sensory electrophysiology in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy.
Clin Neurophysiol. 2007 Sep; 118(9):1999-2004.CN

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of sensory nerve conduction studies in comparison and in combination with motor conductions in diagnosing chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP).

METHODS

We retrospectively compared the electrophysiology of 20 patients with CIDP to that of 20 controls with axonal polyneuropathy, and 20 controls with myopathy. Five sensory abnormality patterns were evaluated.

RESULTS

The "abnormal radial normal sural" ("ARNS") pattern showed a sensitivity of 25% for CIDP and specificity of 100% versus axonal neuropathies (p=0.047). The "abnormal sural normal radial" ("ASNR") pattern had a sensitivity of 75% for axonal neuropathy with a specificity of 80% versus CIDP (p=0.0012). Presence of ARNS or absence of ASNR patterns showed equivalent or superior sensitivity and specificity to most individual motor demyelinating defects for CIDP. Presence of ARNS or absence of ASNR patterns, integrated within three different sets of electrodiagnostic criteria for CIDP, increased sensitivity in all without significantly altering specificity. Effects were most remarkable with the American Academy of Neurology criteria (1991), which showed significantly improved sensitivity (50-85%; p=0.041), with preserved specificity of 100%.

CONCLUSIONS

The use of sensory abnormality patterns appears justified in comparison and combination with motor defects in diagnosing CIDP.

SIGNIFICANCE

Sensory studies may be useful in contributing to the electrodiagnosis of CIDP and their inclusion in existing electrodiagnostic criteria deserves consideration.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Neuromuscular Clinic, Department of Neurology, University Hospitals of Leicester, Leicester, UK. yusuf.rajabally@uhl-tr.nhs.ukNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17644033

Citation

Rajabally, Yusuf A., and Manisha Narasimhan. "The Value of Sensory Electrophysiology in Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy." Clinical Neurophysiology : Official Journal of the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology, vol. 118, no. 9, 2007, pp. 1999-2004.
Rajabally YA, Narasimhan M. The value of sensory electrophysiology in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. Clin Neurophysiol. 2007;118(9):1999-2004.
Rajabally, Y. A., & Narasimhan, M. (2007). The value of sensory electrophysiology in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. Clinical Neurophysiology : Official Journal of the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology, 118(9), 1999-2004.
Rajabally YA, Narasimhan M. The Value of Sensory Electrophysiology in Chronic Inflammatory Demyelinating Polyneuropathy. Clin Neurophysiol. 2007;118(9):1999-2004. PubMed PMID: 17644033.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The value of sensory electrophysiology in chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy. AU - Rajabally,Yusuf A, AU - Narasimhan,Manisha, Y1 - 2007/07/23/ PY - 2007/04/09/received PY - 2007/05/13/revised PY - 2007/06/10/accepted PY - 2007/7/24/pubmed PY - 2007/10/3/medline PY - 2007/7/24/entrez SP - 1999 EP - 2004 JF - Clinical neurophysiology : official journal of the International Federation of Clinical Neurophysiology JO - Clin Neurophysiol VL - 118 IS - 9 N2 - OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of sensory nerve conduction studies in comparison and in combination with motor conductions in diagnosing chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyneuropathy (CIDP). METHODS: We retrospectively compared the electrophysiology of 20 patients with CIDP to that of 20 controls with axonal polyneuropathy, and 20 controls with myopathy. Five sensory abnormality patterns were evaluated. RESULTS: The "abnormal radial normal sural" ("ARNS") pattern showed a sensitivity of 25% for CIDP and specificity of 100% versus axonal neuropathies (p=0.047). The "abnormal sural normal radial" ("ASNR") pattern had a sensitivity of 75% for axonal neuropathy with a specificity of 80% versus CIDP (p=0.0012). Presence of ARNS or absence of ASNR patterns showed equivalent or superior sensitivity and specificity to most individual motor demyelinating defects for CIDP. Presence of ARNS or absence of ASNR patterns, integrated within three different sets of electrodiagnostic criteria for CIDP, increased sensitivity in all without significantly altering specificity. Effects were most remarkable with the American Academy of Neurology criteria (1991), which showed significantly improved sensitivity (50-85%; p=0.041), with preserved specificity of 100%. CONCLUSIONS: The use of sensory abnormality patterns appears justified in comparison and combination with motor defects in diagnosing CIDP. SIGNIFICANCE: Sensory studies may be useful in contributing to the electrodiagnosis of CIDP and their inclusion in existing electrodiagnostic criteria deserves consideration. SN - 1388-2457 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17644033/The_value_of_sensory_electrophysiology_in_chronic_inflammatory_demyelinating_polyneuropathy_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S1388-2457(07)00316-1 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -