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Magnesium intake and risk of type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis.
J Intern Med 2007; 262(2):208-14JI

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To assess the association between magnesium intake and risk of type 2 diabetes.

DESIGN

Meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies.

DATA SOURCES

We retrieved studies published in any language by systematically searching MEDLINE from 1966 to February 2007 and by manually examining the references of the original articles.

STUDY SELECTION

We included prospective cohort studies reporting relative risks with 95% confidence intervals for the association between magnesium intake and incidence of type 2 diabetes.

RESULTS

The seven identified cohort studies of magnesium intake [from foods only (n = 4) or from foods and supplements combined (n = 3)] and incidence of type 2 diabetes included 286,668 participants and 10,912 cases. All but one study found an inverse relation between magnesium intake and risk of type 2 diabetes, and in four studies the association was statistically significant. The overall relative risk for a 100 mg day(-1) increase in magnesium intake was 0.85 (95% CI, 0.79-0.92). Results were similar for intake of dietary magnesium (RR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.77-0.95) and total magnesium (RR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.77-0.89). There was no evidence of publication bias (P = 0.99).

CONCLUSIONS

Magnesium intake was inversely associated with incidence of type 2 diabetes. This finding suggests that increased consumption of magnesium-rich foods such as whole grains, beans, nuts, and green leafy vegetables may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Nutritional Epidemiology, National Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. susanna.larsson@ki.seNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17645588

Citation

Larsson, S C., and A Wolk. "Magnesium Intake and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: a Meta-analysis." Journal of Internal Medicine, vol. 262, no. 2, 2007, pp. 208-14.
Larsson SC, Wolk A. Magnesium intake and risk of type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis. J Intern Med. 2007;262(2):208-14.
Larsson, S. C., & Wolk, A. (2007). Magnesium intake and risk of type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis. Journal of Internal Medicine, 262(2), pp. 208-14.
Larsson SC, Wolk A. Magnesium Intake and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes: a Meta-analysis. J Intern Med. 2007;262(2):208-14. PubMed PMID: 17645588.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Magnesium intake and risk of type 2 diabetes: a meta-analysis. AU - Larsson,S C, AU - Wolk,A, PY - 2007/7/25/pubmed PY - 2007/9/12/medline PY - 2007/7/25/entrez SP - 208 EP - 14 JF - Journal of internal medicine JO - J. Intern. Med. VL - 262 IS - 2 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To assess the association between magnesium intake and risk of type 2 diabetes. DESIGN: Meta-analysis of prospective cohort studies. DATA SOURCES: We retrieved studies published in any language by systematically searching MEDLINE from 1966 to February 2007 and by manually examining the references of the original articles. STUDY SELECTION: We included prospective cohort studies reporting relative risks with 95% confidence intervals for the association between magnesium intake and incidence of type 2 diabetes. RESULTS: The seven identified cohort studies of magnesium intake [from foods only (n = 4) or from foods and supplements combined (n = 3)] and incidence of type 2 diabetes included 286,668 participants and 10,912 cases. All but one study found an inverse relation between magnesium intake and risk of type 2 diabetes, and in four studies the association was statistically significant. The overall relative risk for a 100 mg day(-1) increase in magnesium intake was 0.85 (95% CI, 0.79-0.92). Results were similar for intake of dietary magnesium (RR, 0.86; 95% CI, 0.77-0.95) and total magnesium (RR, 0.83; 95% CI, 0.77-0.89). There was no evidence of publication bias (P = 0.99). CONCLUSIONS: Magnesium intake was inversely associated with incidence of type 2 diabetes. This finding suggests that increased consumption of magnesium-rich foods such as whole grains, beans, nuts, and green leafy vegetables may reduce the risk of type 2 diabetes. SN - 0954-6820 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17645588/Magnesium_intake_and_risk_of_type_2_diabetes:_a_meta_analysis_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2796.2007.01840.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -