Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Sugar and spice and puppy dogs' tails: the psychodynamics of bullying.

Abstract

Bullies and their victims are more likely to engage in violent behavior than those who have never been involved in bullying. In both aggressor and victim, bullying is a sign of potential psychiatric disorder. It is primarily physical in children, becomes relational aggression in adolescents, and often appears in the form of sexual harassment in adulthood. The causes of bullying include the desire to control, revenge, envy, and emotional distress. Bullies have often themselves been bullied. Teachers are frequently reluctant to report bullying, even if they view it as a problem. Bullying deprives children of safety and security, but prevention and intervention are all too often not part of school curricula. The unique characteristics of bully and victim, risk factors leading to bullying behavior, the influence of the parents, and the roles of gender relationships and sex differences are explored in this article.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, USA. annturkel@aol.com

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17650977

Citation

Turkel, Ann Ruth. "Sugar and Spice and Puppy Dogs' Tails: the Psychodynamics of Bullying." The Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychiatry, vol. 35, no. 2, 2007, pp. 243-58.
Turkel AR. Sugar and spice and puppy dogs' tails: the psychodynamics of bullying. J Am Acad Psychoanal Dyn Psychiatry. 2007;35(2):243-58.
Turkel, A. R. (2007). Sugar and spice and puppy dogs' tails: the psychodynamics of bullying. The Journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychiatry, 35(2), pp. 243-58.
Turkel AR. Sugar and Spice and Puppy Dogs' Tails: the Psychodynamics of Bullying. J Am Acad Psychoanal Dyn Psychiatry. 2007;35(2):243-58. PubMed PMID: 17650977.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Sugar and spice and puppy dogs' tails: the psychodynamics of bullying. A1 - Turkel,Ann Ruth, PY - 2007/7/27/pubmed PY - 2007/8/31/medline PY - 2007/7/27/entrez SP - 243 EP - 58 JF - The journal of the American Academy of Psychoanalysis and Dynamic Psychiatry JO - J Am Acad Psychoanal Dyn Psychiatry VL - 35 IS - 2 N2 - Bullies and their victims are more likely to engage in violent behavior than those who have never been involved in bullying. In both aggressor and victim, bullying is a sign of potential psychiatric disorder. It is primarily physical in children, becomes relational aggression in adolescents, and often appears in the form of sexual harassment in adulthood. The causes of bullying include the desire to control, revenge, envy, and emotional distress. Bullies have often themselves been bullied. Teachers are frequently reluctant to report bullying, even if they view it as a problem. Bullying deprives children of safety and security, but prevention and intervention are all too often not part of school curricula. The unique characteristics of bully and victim, risk factors leading to bullying behavior, the influence of the parents, and the roles of gender relationships and sex differences are explored in this article. SN - 1546-0371 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17650977/Sugar_and_spice_and_puppy_dogs'_tails:_the_psychodynamics_of_bullying_ L2 - http://guilfordjournals.com/doi/full/10.1521/jaap.2007.35.2.243 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -