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Dietary Selenium for the counteraction of oxidative damage: fortified foods or supplements?
Br J Nutr. 2008 Jan; 99(1):191-7.BJ

Abstract

Since any significant modification in the Se status, leading to changes in the activity of the seleno-enzymes, may have important consequences on the susceptibility of tissues to oxidative stress, considerable efforts have been made upon increasing Se dietary intake. In this respect, an important debate is still open about the bioavailability and the effectiveness of Se, and more generally nutrients, in supplements compared with foods. Using male Wistar rats, we have compared the effectiveness of two different diets in which an adequate Se content (0.1 mg/kg) was achieved by adding the element as sodium selenite or as component of a lyophilized Se-enriched food, in the counteraction of an oxidative stress induced by intraperitoneal administration of adriamycin. Both Se-enriched diets were able to reduce the consequences of the oxidative stress in liver, mainly by increasing glutathione peroxidase activity. This increase was more evident in rats fed on the diet enriched with the lyophilized food, probably due to the different chemical forms of Se, or to other components of the food itself. Although further studies are needed, data herein presented may contribute to the characterization of the effectiveness of Se from different sources, foods or supplements, in the light of dietary advice to the population concerning improvement of Se intake.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Research Centre on Nutrition and Vitaminology, Department of Biochemistry "G. Moruzzi", University of Bologna, via Irnerio, 48 - 40126 Bologna, Italy. alessandra.bordoni@unibo.itNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17651521

Citation

Bordoni, Alessandra, et al. "Dietary Selenium for the Counteraction of Oxidative Damage: Fortified Foods or Supplements?" The British Journal of Nutrition, vol. 99, no. 1, 2008, pp. 191-7.
Bordoni A, Danesi F, Malaguti M, et al. Dietary Selenium for the counteraction of oxidative damage: fortified foods or supplements? Br J Nutr. 2008;99(1):191-7.
Bordoni, A., Danesi, F., Malaguti, M., Di Nunzio, M., Pasqui, F., Maranesi, M., & Luigi Biagi, P. (2008). Dietary Selenium for the counteraction of oxidative damage: fortified foods or supplements? The British Journal of Nutrition, 99(1), 191-7.
Bordoni A, et al. Dietary Selenium for the Counteraction of Oxidative Damage: Fortified Foods or Supplements. Br J Nutr. 2008;99(1):191-7. PubMed PMID: 17651521.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Dietary Selenium for the counteraction of oxidative damage: fortified foods or supplements? AU - Bordoni,Alessandra, AU - Danesi,Francesca, AU - Malaguti,Marco, AU - Di Nunzio,Mattia, AU - Pasqui,Francesca, AU - Maranesi,Magda, AU - Luigi Biagi,Pier, Y1 - 2007/07/26/ PY - 2007/7/27/pubmed PY - 2008/5/17/medline PY - 2007/7/27/entrez SP - 191 EP - 7 JF - The British journal of nutrition JO - Br. J. Nutr. VL - 99 IS - 1 N2 - Since any significant modification in the Se status, leading to changes in the activity of the seleno-enzymes, may have important consequences on the susceptibility of tissues to oxidative stress, considerable efforts have been made upon increasing Se dietary intake. In this respect, an important debate is still open about the bioavailability and the effectiveness of Se, and more generally nutrients, in supplements compared with foods. Using male Wistar rats, we have compared the effectiveness of two different diets in which an adequate Se content (0.1 mg/kg) was achieved by adding the element as sodium selenite or as component of a lyophilized Se-enriched food, in the counteraction of an oxidative stress induced by intraperitoneal administration of adriamycin. Both Se-enriched diets were able to reduce the consequences of the oxidative stress in liver, mainly by increasing glutathione peroxidase activity. This increase was more evident in rats fed on the diet enriched with the lyophilized food, probably due to the different chemical forms of Se, or to other components of the food itself. Although further studies are needed, data herein presented may contribute to the characterization of the effectiveness of Se from different sources, foods or supplements, in the light of dietary advice to the population concerning improvement of Se intake. SN - 0007-1145 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17651521/Dietary_Selenium_for_the_counteraction_of_oxidative_damage:_fortified_foods_or_supplements L2 - https://www.cambridge.org/core/product/identifier/S0007114507793911/type/journal_article DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -