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Repeated administration of vanilloid receptor TRPV1 antagonists attenuates hyperthermia elicited by TRPV1 blockade.
J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2007 Oct; 323(1):128-37.JP

Abstract

Capsaicin, the active ingredient in some pain-relieving creams, is an agonist of a nonselective cation channel known as the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1). The pain-relieving mechanism of capsaicin includes desensitization of the channel, suggesting that TRPV1 antagonism may be a viable pain therapy approach. In agreement with the above notion, several TRPV1 antagonists have been reported to act as antihyperalgesics. Here, we report the in vitro and in vivo characterization of a novel and selective TRPV1 antagonist, N-(4-[6-(4-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-pyrimidin-4-yloxy]-benzothiazol-2-yl)-acetamide I (AMG 517), and compare its pharmacology with that of a closely related analog, tert-butyl-2-(6-([2-(acetylamino)-1,3-benzothiazol-4-yl]oxy)pyrimidin-4-yl)-5-(trifluoromethyl)phenylcarbamate (AMG8163). Both AMG 517 and AMG8163 potently and completely antagonized capsaicin, proton, and heat activation of TRPV1 in vitro and blocked capsaicin-induced flinch in rats in vivo. To support initial clinical investigations, AMG 517 was evaluated in a comprehensive panel of toxicology studies that included in vivo assessments in rodents, dogs, and monkeys. The toxicology studies indicated that AMG 517 was generally well tolerated; however, transient increases in body temperature (hyperthermia) were observed in all species after AMG 517 dosing. To further investigate this effect, we tested and showed that the antipyretic, acetaminophen, suppressed the hyperthermia caused by TRPV1 blockade. We also showed that repeated administration of TRPV1 antagonists attenuated the hyperthermia response, whereas the efficacy in capsaicin-induced flinch model was maintained. In conclusion, these studies suggest that the transient hyperthermia elicited by TRPV1 blockade may be manageable in the development of TRPV1 antagonists as therapeutic agents. However, the impact of TRPV1 antagonist-induced hyperthermia on their clinical utility is still unknown.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Neuroscience, MS-29-2-B, One Amgen Center Dr., Thousand Oaks, CA 91320-1799, USA. ngavva@amgen.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17652633

Citation

Gavva, Narender R., et al. "Repeated Administration of Vanilloid Receptor TRPV1 Antagonists Attenuates Hyperthermia Elicited By TRPV1 Blockade." The Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, vol. 323, no. 1, 2007, pp. 128-37.
Gavva NR, Bannon AW, Hovland DN, et al. Repeated administration of vanilloid receptor TRPV1 antagonists attenuates hyperthermia elicited by TRPV1 blockade. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2007;323(1):128-37.
Gavva, N. R., Bannon, A. W., Hovland, D. N., Lehto, S. G., Klionsky, L., Surapaneni, S., Immke, D. C., Henley, C., Arik, L., Bak, A., Davis, J., Ernst, N., Hever, G., Kuang, R., Shi, L., Tamir, R., Wang, J., Wang, W., Zajic, G., ... Treanor, J. J. (2007). Repeated administration of vanilloid receptor TRPV1 antagonists attenuates hyperthermia elicited by TRPV1 blockade. The Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, 323(1), 128-37.
Gavva NR, et al. Repeated Administration of Vanilloid Receptor TRPV1 Antagonists Attenuates Hyperthermia Elicited By TRPV1 Blockade. J Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2007;323(1):128-37. PubMed PMID: 17652633.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Repeated administration of vanilloid receptor TRPV1 antagonists attenuates hyperthermia elicited by TRPV1 blockade. AU - Gavva,Narender R, AU - Bannon,Anthony W, AU - Hovland,David N,Jr AU - Lehto,Sonya G, AU - Klionsky,Lana, AU - Surapaneni,Sekhar, AU - Immke,David C, AU - Henley,Charles, AU - Arik,Leyla, AU - Bak,Annette, AU - Davis,James, AU - Ernst,Nadia, AU - Hever,Gal, AU - Kuang,Rongzhen, AU - Shi,Licheng, AU - Tamir,Rami, AU - Wang,Jue, AU - Wang,Weiya, AU - Zajic,Gary, AU - Zhu,Dawn, AU - Norman,Mark H, AU - Louis,Jean-Claude, AU - Magal,Ella, AU - Treanor,James J S, Y1 - 2007/07/25/ PY - 2007/7/27/pubmed PY - 2007/11/6/medline PY - 2007/7/27/entrez SP - 128 EP - 37 JF - The Journal of pharmacology and experimental therapeutics JO - J Pharmacol Exp Ther VL - 323 IS - 1 N2 - Capsaicin, the active ingredient in some pain-relieving creams, is an agonist of a nonselective cation channel known as the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1). The pain-relieving mechanism of capsaicin includes desensitization of the channel, suggesting that TRPV1 antagonism may be a viable pain therapy approach. In agreement with the above notion, several TRPV1 antagonists have been reported to act as antihyperalgesics. Here, we report the in vitro and in vivo characterization of a novel and selective TRPV1 antagonist, N-(4-[6-(4-trifluoromethyl-phenyl)-pyrimidin-4-yloxy]-benzothiazol-2-yl)-acetamide I (AMG 517), and compare its pharmacology with that of a closely related analog, tert-butyl-2-(6-([2-(acetylamino)-1,3-benzothiazol-4-yl]oxy)pyrimidin-4-yl)-5-(trifluoromethyl)phenylcarbamate (AMG8163). Both AMG 517 and AMG8163 potently and completely antagonized capsaicin, proton, and heat activation of TRPV1 in vitro and blocked capsaicin-induced flinch in rats in vivo. To support initial clinical investigations, AMG 517 was evaluated in a comprehensive panel of toxicology studies that included in vivo assessments in rodents, dogs, and monkeys. The toxicology studies indicated that AMG 517 was generally well tolerated; however, transient increases in body temperature (hyperthermia) were observed in all species after AMG 517 dosing. To further investigate this effect, we tested and showed that the antipyretic, acetaminophen, suppressed the hyperthermia caused by TRPV1 blockade. We also showed that repeated administration of TRPV1 antagonists attenuated the hyperthermia response, whereas the efficacy in capsaicin-induced flinch model was maintained. In conclusion, these studies suggest that the transient hyperthermia elicited by TRPV1 blockade may be manageable in the development of TRPV1 antagonists as therapeutic agents. However, the impact of TRPV1 antagonist-induced hyperthermia on their clinical utility is still unknown. SN - 0022-3565 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17652633/Repeated_administration_of_vanilloid_receptor_TRPV1_antagonists_attenuates_hyperthermia_elicited_by_TRPV1_blockade_ L2 - http://jpet.aspetjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=17652633 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -