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Hemangioblastoma of filum terminale associated with arteriovenous shunting.
Surg Neurol. 2007 Aug; 68(2):211-4; discussion 214-5.SN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Spinal arteriovenous shunt typically presents in middle age or in the elderly with a strong male predilection. The clinical presentation is usually progressive neurological deficits such as paraparesis or incontinence due to cord edema, although back pain is also a common presentation. Progress of neurological deficit is typically stopped by occlusion of the shunt (surgically or endovascularly), but the return of loss of function may be found in less than half of these patients. In contrast, spinal hemangioblastomas usually occur in adults, and the most common presentation is pain with radiculopathy. Location in the filum terminale is very rare.

CASE DESCRIPTION

After a review of the medical literature, we identified 7 cases of hemangioblastomas arising from the filum terminale (Am J Neuroradiol. 2005;26:936-945; Acta Neurochir [Wien]. 2000;142:1059-1062; J Neurosurg Sci. 2001;45:58-62; J Clin Neurosci. 2006;13:285-288; Neurosurgery. 1999;44:220-223; Clin Neurol Neurosurg. 1985;87:55-59). We report an additional case of a filum terminale hemangioblastoma occurring in a 64-year-old man with 1 month exacerbation of chronic low back pain. Preoperatively, it was misdiagnosed as filum terminale arteriovenous fistula.

CONCLUSION

Even with modern imaging, preoperative diagnosis can still be difficult.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Neurosurgery, Prince of Wales Hospital, Chinese University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Case Reports
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17662364

Citation

Wong, George K C., et al. "Hemangioblastoma of Filum Terminale Associated With Arteriovenous Shunting." Surgical Neurology, vol. 68, no. 2, 2007, pp. 211-4; discussion 214-5.
Wong GK, Zhu XL, Ng HK, et al. Hemangioblastoma of filum terminale associated with arteriovenous shunting. Surg Neurol. 2007;68(2):211-4; discussion 214-5.
Wong, G. K., Zhu, X. L., Ng, H. K., Mak, H., Yu, S. C., Wong, J. K., & Poon, W. S. (2007). Hemangioblastoma of filum terminale associated with arteriovenous shunting. Surgical Neurology, 68(2), 211-4; discussion 214-5.
Wong GK, et al. Hemangioblastoma of Filum Terminale Associated With Arteriovenous Shunting. Surg Neurol. 2007;68(2):211-4; discussion 214-5. PubMed PMID: 17662364.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Hemangioblastoma of filum terminale associated with arteriovenous shunting. AU - Wong,George K C, AU - Zhu,X L, AU - Ng,H K, AU - Mak,Henry, AU - Yu,Simon C H, AU - Wong,Jeffrey K T, AU - Poon,W S, PY - 2006/07/18/received PY - 2006/10/05/accepted PY - 2007/7/31/pubmed PY - 2007/10/6/medline PY - 2007/7/31/entrez SP - 211-4; discussion 214-5 JF - Surgical neurology JO - Surg Neurol VL - 68 IS - 2 N2 - BACKGROUND: Spinal arteriovenous shunt typically presents in middle age or in the elderly with a strong male predilection. The clinical presentation is usually progressive neurological deficits such as paraparesis or incontinence due to cord edema, although back pain is also a common presentation. Progress of neurological deficit is typically stopped by occlusion of the shunt (surgically or endovascularly), but the return of loss of function may be found in less than half of these patients. In contrast, spinal hemangioblastomas usually occur in adults, and the most common presentation is pain with radiculopathy. Location in the filum terminale is very rare. CASE DESCRIPTION: After a review of the medical literature, we identified 7 cases of hemangioblastomas arising from the filum terminale (Am J Neuroradiol. 2005;26:936-945; Acta Neurochir [Wien]. 2000;142:1059-1062; J Neurosurg Sci. 2001;45:58-62; J Clin Neurosci. 2006;13:285-288; Neurosurgery. 1999;44:220-223; Clin Neurol Neurosurg. 1985;87:55-59). We report an additional case of a filum terminale hemangioblastoma occurring in a 64-year-old man with 1 month exacerbation of chronic low back pain. Preoperatively, it was misdiagnosed as filum terminale arteriovenous fistula. CONCLUSION: Even with modern imaging, preoperative diagnosis can still be difficult. SN - 0090-3019 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17662364/Hemangioblastoma_of_filum_terminale_associated_with_arteriovenous_shunting_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0090-3019(06)01000-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -