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Parental tobacco use is associated with increased risk of child malnutrition in Bangladesh.
Nutrition. 2007 Oct; 23(10):731-8.N

Abstract

OBJECTIVES

We investigated the relation between parental tobacco use and malnutrition in children <5 y of age and compared expenditures on foods in households with and without tobacco use.

METHODS

Tobacco use, child anthropometry, and other factors were examined in a stratified, multistage cluster sample of 77 678 households from the Bangladesh Nutrition Surveillance Project (2005-2006). Main outcome measurements were stunting, underweight, and wasting, and severe stunting, severe underweight, and severe wasting. Secondary outcomes included the proportion of household expenditures spent on food.

RESULTS

The prevalence of parental tobacco use was 69.9%. Using the new World Health Organization child growth standards, prevalences of stunting, underweight, and wasting were 46.0%, 37.6%, and 12.3%, respectively. After adjusting for potential confounders, parental tobacco use was associated with an increased risk of stunting (odds ratio [OR] 1.17, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.12-1.21, P < 0.0001), underweight (OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.12-1.22, P < 0.0001), and wasting (OR 1.10, 95% CI 1.03-1.17, P = 0.004), and severe stunting (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.10-1.23, P < 0.0001), severe underweight (OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.13-1.30, P < 0.0001), and severe wasting (OR 1.14, 95% CI 0.98-1.32, P = 0.09). Households with tobacco use spent proportionately less per capita on food items and other necessities.

CONCLUSIONS

In Bangladesh parental tobacco use may exacerbate child malnutrition and divert household funds away from food and other necessities. Further studies with a stronger analytic approach are needed. These results suggest that tobacco control should be part of public health strategies aimed at decreasing child malnutrition in developing countries.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17664060

Citation

Best, Cora M., et al. "Parental Tobacco Use Is Associated With Increased Risk of Child Malnutrition in Bangladesh." Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), vol. 23, no. 10, 2007, pp. 731-8.
Best CM, Sun K, de Pee S, et al. Parental tobacco use is associated with increased risk of child malnutrition in Bangladesh. Nutrition. 2007;23(10):731-8.
Best, C. M., Sun, K., de Pee, S., Bloem, M. W., Stallkamp, G., & Semba, R. D. (2007). Parental tobacco use is associated with increased risk of child malnutrition in Bangladesh. Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.), 23(10), 731-8.
Best CM, et al. Parental Tobacco Use Is Associated With Increased Risk of Child Malnutrition in Bangladesh. Nutrition. 2007;23(10):731-8. PubMed PMID: 17664060.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Parental tobacco use is associated with increased risk of child malnutrition in Bangladesh. AU - Best,Cora M, AU - Sun,Kai, AU - de Pee,Saskia, AU - Bloem,Martin W, AU - Stallkamp,Gudrun, AU - Semba,Richard D, Y1 - 2007/07/30/ PY - 2007/01/09/received PY - 2007/06/23/revised PY - 2007/06/25/accepted PY - 2007/8/1/pubmed PY - 2007/12/6/medline PY - 2007/8/1/entrez SP - 731 EP - 8 JF - Nutrition (Burbank, Los Angeles County, Calif.) JO - Nutrition VL - 23 IS - 10 N2 - OBJECTIVES: We investigated the relation between parental tobacco use and malnutrition in children <5 y of age and compared expenditures on foods in households with and without tobacco use. METHODS: Tobacco use, child anthropometry, and other factors were examined in a stratified, multistage cluster sample of 77 678 households from the Bangladesh Nutrition Surveillance Project (2005-2006). Main outcome measurements were stunting, underweight, and wasting, and severe stunting, severe underweight, and severe wasting. Secondary outcomes included the proportion of household expenditures spent on food. RESULTS: The prevalence of parental tobacco use was 69.9%. Using the new World Health Organization child growth standards, prevalences of stunting, underweight, and wasting were 46.0%, 37.6%, and 12.3%, respectively. After adjusting for potential confounders, parental tobacco use was associated with an increased risk of stunting (odds ratio [OR] 1.17, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.12-1.21, P < 0.0001), underweight (OR 1.17, 95% CI 1.12-1.22, P < 0.0001), and wasting (OR 1.10, 95% CI 1.03-1.17, P = 0.004), and severe stunting (OR 1.16, 95% CI 1.10-1.23, P < 0.0001), severe underweight (OR 1.21, 95% CI 1.13-1.30, P < 0.0001), and severe wasting (OR 1.14, 95% CI 0.98-1.32, P = 0.09). Households with tobacco use spent proportionately less per capita on food items and other necessities. CONCLUSIONS: In Bangladesh parental tobacco use may exacerbate child malnutrition and divert household funds away from food and other necessities. Further studies with a stronger analytic approach are needed. These results suggest that tobacco control should be part of public health strategies aimed at decreasing child malnutrition in developing countries. SN - 0899-9007 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17664060/Parental_tobacco_use_is_associated_with_increased_risk_of_child_malnutrition_in_Bangladesh_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0899-9007(07)00219-5 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -