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Status of uric acid management in hypertensive subjects.
Hypertens Res. 2007 Jun; 30(6):549-54.HR

Abstract

Hyperuricemia in hypertensive subjects has been considered one of risk factors of cardiovascular diseases. We investigated the status of uric acid management in 799 hypertensive subjects (432 females and 367 males; mean age 70.9 years) managed by 43 doctors (19 cardiologists and 24 noncardiologists; 25 private practice doctors and 18 hospital doctors). The serum uric acid level was available in 85.7% of the patients. This availability was equivalent regardless of facility size, and more cardiologists than noncardiologists monitored this information. The prevalence of hyperuricemia was 17.5% and was higher in men and in patients with high triglyceridemia, left ventricular hypertrophy, renal dysfunction, proteinuria, and smokers, but was not higher in subjects with chronic heart failure, diabetes mellitus, and those with prescriptions for diuretics and beta-blockers. The average serum uric acid level was higher in men and patients with chronic heart failure, renal dysfunction, high triglyceridemia, low high-density cholesterolemia, smokers, and subjects prescribed beta-blockers. Fifty percent of hyperuricemic patients were medicated, and 48.6% of them cleared the uric acid target level (6 mg/dL). No differences were observed in the treatment rate or the achievement rate of the target between genders, concurrent diseases, and physician specialties. Although doctors, especially cardiologists, have a high concern for the serum uric acid level, they do not intervene intensively, and specific treatment for individual patterns is not routinely given. Thus, more attention to uric acid management is necessary in hypertensive subjects to prevent cardiovascular diseases.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Regenerative Medicine and Therapeutics, Tottori University Graduate School of Medical Sciences, Yonago, Japan. yasutaka@grape.med.tottori-u.ac.jpNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17664859

Citation

Yamamoto, Yasutaka, et al. "Status of Uric Acid Management in Hypertensive Subjects." Hypertension Research : Official Journal of the Japanese Society of Hypertension, vol. 30, no. 6, 2007, pp. 549-54.
Yamamoto Y, Matsubara K, Igawa G, et al. Status of uric acid management in hypertensive subjects. Hypertens Res. 2007;30(6):549-54.
Yamamoto, Y., Matsubara, K., Igawa, G., Kaetsu, Y., Sugihara, S., Matsuura, T., Ando, F., Sonoyama, K., Hamada, T., Ogino, K., Igawa, O., Shigemasa, C., & Hisatome, I. (2007). Status of uric acid management in hypertensive subjects. Hypertension Research : Official Journal of the Japanese Society of Hypertension, 30(6), 549-54.
Yamamoto Y, et al. Status of Uric Acid Management in Hypertensive Subjects. Hypertens Res. 2007;30(6):549-54. PubMed PMID: 17664859.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Status of uric acid management in hypertensive subjects. AU - Yamamoto,Yasutaka, AU - Matsubara,Koichi, AU - Igawa,Go, AU - Kaetsu,Yasuhiro, AU - Sugihara,Shinobu, AU - Matsuura,Takashi, AU - Ando,Fumihiro, AU - Sonoyama,Kazuhiko, AU - Hamada,Toshihiro, AU - Ogino,Kazuhide, AU - Igawa,Osamu, AU - Shigemasa,Chiaki, AU - Hisatome,Ichiro, PY - 2007/8/1/pubmed PY - 2007/9/14/medline PY - 2007/8/1/entrez SP - 549 EP - 54 JF - Hypertension research : official journal of the Japanese Society of Hypertension JO - Hypertens Res VL - 30 IS - 6 N2 - Hyperuricemia in hypertensive subjects has been considered one of risk factors of cardiovascular diseases. We investigated the status of uric acid management in 799 hypertensive subjects (432 females and 367 males; mean age 70.9 years) managed by 43 doctors (19 cardiologists and 24 noncardiologists; 25 private practice doctors and 18 hospital doctors). The serum uric acid level was available in 85.7% of the patients. This availability was equivalent regardless of facility size, and more cardiologists than noncardiologists monitored this information. The prevalence of hyperuricemia was 17.5% and was higher in men and in patients with high triglyceridemia, left ventricular hypertrophy, renal dysfunction, proteinuria, and smokers, but was not higher in subjects with chronic heart failure, diabetes mellitus, and those with prescriptions for diuretics and beta-blockers. The average serum uric acid level was higher in men and patients with chronic heart failure, renal dysfunction, high triglyceridemia, low high-density cholesterolemia, smokers, and subjects prescribed beta-blockers. Fifty percent of hyperuricemic patients were medicated, and 48.6% of them cleared the uric acid target level (6 mg/dL). No differences were observed in the treatment rate or the achievement rate of the target between genders, concurrent diseases, and physician specialties. Although doctors, especially cardiologists, have a high concern for the serum uric acid level, they do not intervene intensively, and specific treatment for individual patterns is not routinely given. Thus, more attention to uric acid management is necessary in hypertensive subjects to prevent cardiovascular diseases. SN - 0916-9636 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17664859/Status_of_uric_acid_management_in_hypertensive_subjects_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -