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Correlation and comparison of the model for end-stage liver disease, portal pressure, and serum sodium for outcome prediction in patients with liver cirrhosis.
J Clin Gastroenterol. 2007 Aug; 41(7):706-12.JC

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The model for end-stage liver disease (MELD), hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG), and serum sodium (SNa) are important prognostic markers for patients with liver cirrhosis. The correlation among these markers and their predictive accuracy for survival are unclear.

METHODS

A total of 213 cirrhotic patients undergoing hemodynamic measurement were analyzed. The correlations between MELD score, SNa, and hemodynamic parameters were investigated.

RESULTS

There was a significant correlation between MELD and HVPG (r=0.255, P<0.001), between SNa and MELD (r=-0.483, P<0.001), and between HVPG and SNa (r=-0.213, P=0.002). Using mortality as the end-point, the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for MELD was 0.789, compared with 0.659 for HVPG (P=0.165) and 0.860 for SNa (P=0.34) at 3 months; the difference between HVPG and SNa was significant (P=0.015). The AUC at 6 months was significantly higher for SNa and MELD compared with that of HVPG. Among 134 patients with low (<14) MELD scores, a high (>16 mm Hg) HVPG, and low SNa (<135 mEq/L) predicted early mortality. In the Cox multivariate model, MELD, HVPG, and Child-Turcotte-Pugh scores were consistently identified as independent poor prognostic predictors when they were treated either as dichotomous or continuous variables in the model.

CONCLUSIONS

MELD score is closely associated with HVPG and SNa in cirrhotic patients. HVPG is not superior to MELD score or SNa for short-term outcome prediction. High HVPG and low SNa may identify high-risk patients with low MELD scores. High MELD, HVPG, and Child-Turcotte-Pugh scores are independent predictors of poor long-term survival.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Faculty of Medicine, Institute of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Department of Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17667056

Citation

Wang, Ying-Wen, et al. "Correlation and Comparison of the Model for End-stage Liver Disease, Portal Pressure, and Serum Sodium for Outcome Prediction in Patients With Liver Cirrhosis." Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, vol. 41, no. 7, 2007, pp. 706-12.
Wang YW, Huo TI, Yang YY, et al. Correlation and comparison of the model for end-stage liver disease, portal pressure, and serum sodium for outcome prediction in patients with liver cirrhosis. J Clin Gastroenterol. 2007;41(7):706-12.
Wang, Y. W., Huo, T. I., Yang, Y. Y., Hou, M. C., Lee, P. C., Lin, H. C., Lee, F. Y., Chi, C. W., & Lee, S. D. (2007). Correlation and comparison of the model for end-stage liver disease, portal pressure, and serum sodium for outcome prediction in patients with liver cirrhosis. Journal of Clinical Gastroenterology, 41(7), 706-12.
Wang YW, et al. Correlation and Comparison of the Model for End-stage Liver Disease, Portal Pressure, and Serum Sodium for Outcome Prediction in Patients With Liver Cirrhosis. J Clin Gastroenterol. 2007;41(7):706-12. PubMed PMID: 17667056.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Correlation and comparison of the model for end-stage liver disease, portal pressure, and serum sodium for outcome prediction in patients with liver cirrhosis. AU - Wang,Ying-Wen, AU - Huo,Teh-Ia, AU - Yang,Ying-Ying, AU - Hou,Ming-Chih, AU - Lee,Pui-Ching, AU - Lin,Han-Chieh, AU - Lee,Fa-Yauh, AU - Chi,Chin-Wen, AU - Lee,Shou-Dong, PY - 2007/8/2/pubmed PY - 2007/10/5/medline PY - 2007/8/2/entrez SP - 706 EP - 12 JF - Journal of clinical gastroenterology JO - J. Clin. Gastroenterol. VL - 41 IS - 7 N2 - BACKGROUND: The model for end-stage liver disease (MELD), hepatic venous pressure gradient (HVPG), and serum sodium (SNa) are important prognostic markers for patients with liver cirrhosis. The correlation among these markers and their predictive accuracy for survival are unclear. METHODS: A total of 213 cirrhotic patients undergoing hemodynamic measurement were analyzed. The correlations between MELD score, SNa, and hemodynamic parameters were investigated. RESULTS: There was a significant correlation between MELD and HVPG (r=0.255, P<0.001), between SNa and MELD (r=-0.483, P<0.001), and between HVPG and SNa (r=-0.213, P=0.002). Using mortality as the end-point, the area under receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) for MELD was 0.789, compared with 0.659 for HVPG (P=0.165) and 0.860 for SNa (P=0.34) at 3 months; the difference between HVPG and SNa was significant (P=0.015). The AUC at 6 months was significantly higher for SNa and MELD compared with that of HVPG. Among 134 patients with low (<14) MELD scores, a high (>16 mm Hg) HVPG, and low SNa (<135 mEq/L) predicted early mortality. In the Cox multivariate model, MELD, HVPG, and Child-Turcotte-Pugh scores were consistently identified as independent poor prognostic predictors when they were treated either as dichotomous or continuous variables in the model. CONCLUSIONS: MELD score is closely associated with HVPG and SNa in cirrhotic patients. HVPG is not superior to MELD score or SNa for short-term outcome prediction. High HVPG and low SNa may identify high-risk patients with low MELD scores. High MELD, HVPG, and Child-Turcotte-Pugh scores are independent predictors of poor long-term survival. SN - 0192-0790 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17667056/Correlation_and_comparison_of_the_model_for_end_stage_liver_disease_portal_pressure_and_serum_sodium_for_outcome_prediction_in_patients_with_liver_cirrhosis_ L2 - http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/MCG.0b013e31802dabb3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -