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Intelligibility of speech in noise at high presentation levels: effects of hearing loss and frequency region.
J Acoust Soc Am. 2007 Aug; 122(2):1130-7.JA

Abstract

These experiments examined how high presentation levels influence speech recognition for high- and low-frequency stimuli in noise. Normally hearing (NH) and hearing-impaired (HI) listeners were tested. In Experiment 1, high- and low-frequency bandwidths yielding 70%-correct word recognition in quiet were determined at levels associated with broadband speech at 75 dB SPL. In Experiment 2, broadband and band-limited sentences (based on passbands measured in Experiment 1) were presented at this level in speech-shaped noise filtered to the same frequency bandwidths as targets. Noise levels were adjusted to produce approximately 30%-correct word recognition. Frequency bandwidths and signal-to-noise ratios supporting criterion performance in Experiment 2 were tested at 75, 87.5, and 100 dB SPL in Experiment 3. Performance tended to decrease as levels increased. For NH listeners, this "rollover" effect was greater for high-frequency and broadband materials than for low-frequency stimuli. For HI listeners, the 75- to 87.5-dB increase improved signal audibility for high-frequency stimuli and rollover was not observed. However, the 87.5- to 100-dB increase produced qualitatively similar results for both groups: scores decreased most for high-frequency stimuli and least for low-frequency materials. Predictions of speech intelligibility by quantitative methods such as the Speech Intelligibility Index may be improved if rollover effects are modeled as frequency dependent.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Army Audiology and Speech Center, Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC 20307-5001, USA. walter.summers@na.amedd.army.milNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17672659

Citation

Summers, Van, and Mary T. Cord. "Intelligibility of Speech in Noise at High Presentation Levels: Effects of Hearing Loss and Frequency Region." The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, vol. 122, no. 2, 2007, pp. 1130-7.
Summers V, Cord MT. Intelligibility of speech in noise at high presentation levels: effects of hearing loss and frequency region. J Acoust Soc Am. 2007;122(2):1130-7.
Summers, V., & Cord, M. T. (2007). Intelligibility of speech in noise at high presentation levels: effects of hearing loss and frequency region. The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 122(2), 1130-7.
Summers V, Cord MT. Intelligibility of Speech in Noise at High Presentation Levels: Effects of Hearing Loss and Frequency Region. J Acoust Soc Am. 2007;122(2):1130-7. PubMed PMID: 17672659.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Intelligibility of speech in noise at high presentation levels: effects of hearing loss and frequency region. AU - Summers,Van, AU - Cord,Mary T, PY - 2007/8/4/pubmed PY - 2007/9/15/medline PY - 2007/8/4/entrez SP - 1130 EP - 7 JF - The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America JO - J Acoust Soc Am VL - 122 IS - 2 N2 - These experiments examined how high presentation levels influence speech recognition for high- and low-frequency stimuli in noise. Normally hearing (NH) and hearing-impaired (HI) listeners were tested. In Experiment 1, high- and low-frequency bandwidths yielding 70%-correct word recognition in quiet were determined at levels associated with broadband speech at 75 dB SPL. In Experiment 2, broadband and band-limited sentences (based on passbands measured in Experiment 1) were presented at this level in speech-shaped noise filtered to the same frequency bandwidths as targets. Noise levels were adjusted to produce approximately 30%-correct word recognition. Frequency bandwidths and signal-to-noise ratios supporting criterion performance in Experiment 2 were tested at 75, 87.5, and 100 dB SPL in Experiment 3. Performance tended to decrease as levels increased. For NH listeners, this "rollover" effect was greater for high-frequency and broadband materials than for low-frequency stimuli. For HI listeners, the 75- to 87.5-dB increase improved signal audibility for high-frequency stimuli and rollover was not observed. However, the 87.5- to 100-dB increase produced qualitatively similar results for both groups: scores decreased most for high-frequency stimuli and least for low-frequency materials. Predictions of speech intelligibility by quantitative methods such as the Speech Intelligibility Index may be improved if rollover effects are modeled as frequency dependent. SN - 1520-8524 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17672659/Intelligibility_of_speech_in_noise_at_high_presentation_levels:_effects_of_hearing_loss_and_frequency_region_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1121/1.2751251 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -