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Brief report: Decreased bone mineral density as a long-term complication of teenage-onset anorexia nervosa.
Eur Eat Disord Rev 2007; 15(4):290-5EE

Abstract

OBJECTIVE

To follow up bone mineral density (BMD) 4 years after decreased BMD was diagnosed in adult individuals with teenage-onset anorexia nervosa (AN).

METHOD

In a previous study BMD was assessed in 39 individuals (36 women, 3 men) 11 years after AN onset. Decreased BMD occurred in a minority. In the present study, a 4-year follow-up of individuals with decreased BMD, 11 AN women were reassessed by using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Two women still had an eating disorder (ED).

RESULTS

Eight out of eleven women met criteria for decreased BMD/osteoporosis. There was an increase in BMD of total body and lumbar spine (LS). There was a relationship between lumbar BMD and BMI.

CONCLUSION

At follow-up of decreased BMD in adult women with teenage-onset of AN, there is a possibility of improvement of BMD.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, Göteborg University, Göteborg, Sweden. elisabet.wentz@vgregion.seNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17676699

Citation

Wentz, Elisabet, et al. "Brief Report: Decreased Bone Mineral Density as a Long-term Complication of Teenage-onset Anorexia Nervosa." European Eating Disorders Review : the Journal of the Eating Disorders Association, vol. 15, no. 4, 2007, pp. 290-5.
Wentz E, Mellström D, Gillberg IC, et al. Brief report: Decreased bone mineral density as a long-term complication of teenage-onset anorexia nervosa. Eur Eat Disord Rev. 2007;15(4):290-5.
Wentz, E., Mellström, D., Gillberg, I. C., Gillberg, C., & Råstam, M. (2007). Brief report: Decreased bone mineral density as a long-term complication of teenage-onset anorexia nervosa. European Eating Disorders Review : the Journal of the Eating Disorders Association, 15(4), pp. 290-5.
Wentz E, et al. Brief Report: Decreased Bone Mineral Density as a Long-term Complication of Teenage-onset Anorexia Nervosa. Eur Eat Disord Rev. 2007;15(4):290-5. PubMed PMID: 17676699.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Brief report: Decreased bone mineral density as a long-term complication of teenage-onset anorexia nervosa. AU - Wentz,Elisabet, AU - Mellström,Dan, AU - Gillberg,I Carina, AU - Gillberg,Christopher, AU - Råstam,Maria, PY - 2007/8/7/pubmed PY - 2007/9/22/medline PY - 2007/8/7/entrez SP - 290 EP - 5 JF - European eating disorders review : the journal of the Eating Disorders Association JO - Eur Eat Disord Rev VL - 15 IS - 4 N2 - OBJECTIVE: To follow up bone mineral density (BMD) 4 years after decreased BMD was diagnosed in adult individuals with teenage-onset anorexia nervosa (AN). METHOD: In a previous study BMD was assessed in 39 individuals (36 women, 3 men) 11 years after AN onset. Decreased BMD occurred in a minority. In the present study, a 4-year follow-up of individuals with decreased BMD, 11 AN women were reassessed by using dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA). Two women still had an eating disorder (ED). RESULTS: Eight out of eleven women met criteria for decreased BMD/osteoporosis. There was an increase in BMD of total body and lumbar spine (LS). There was a relationship between lumbar BMD and BMI. CONCLUSION: At follow-up of decreased BMD in adult women with teenage-onset of AN, there is a possibility of improvement of BMD. SN - 1099-0968 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17676699/Brief_report:_Decreased_bone_mineral_density_as_a_long_term_complication_of_teenage_onset_anorexia_nervosa_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1002/erv.795 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -