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Oxidative stress and adverse adipokine profile characterize the metabolic syndrome in children.
J Cardiometab Syndr. 2006 Summer; 1(4):248-52.JC

Abstract

Thirty-four children were assessed for body composition, blood pressure, lipids, glucose tolerance, markers of insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and adipokines. Children were divided into 3 groups: (1) normal weight, (2) overweight but otherwise healthy, and (3) overweight with the metabolic syndrome. There were no differences among any of the groups for age or Tanner stage, and anthropometric variables were similar between the overweight and the overweight with the metabolic syndrome groups. Differences across groups were found for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P < .001), triglycerides (P < .01), fasting insulin (P < .001), homeostasis model assessment (P < .01), adiponectin (P < .05), leptin (P < .0001), C-reactive protein (P < .0001), interleukin 6 (P < .0001), and 8-isoprostane (P < .001). In children, oxidative stress and adipokine levels worsen throughout the continuum of obesity and especially in the presence of components of the metabolic syndrome. Overweight children with components of the metabolic syndrome may be at elevated risk for future cardiovascular disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Departments of Pediatrics, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, USA. kelly105@umn.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17679810

Citation

Kelly, Aaron S., et al. "Oxidative Stress and Adverse Adipokine Profile Characterize the Metabolic Syndrome in Children." Journal of the Cardiometabolic Syndrome, vol. 1, no. 4, 2006, pp. 248-52.
Kelly AS, Steinberger J, Kaiser DR, et al. Oxidative stress and adverse adipokine profile characterize the metabolic syndrome in children. J Cardiometab Syndr. 2006;1(4):248-52.
Kelly, A. S., Steinberger, J., Kaiser, D. R., Olson, T. P., Bank, A. J., & Dengel, D. R. (2006). Oxidative stress and adverse adipokine profile characterize the metabolic syndrome in children. Journal of the Cardiometabolic Syndrome, 1(4), 248-52.
Kelly AS, et al. Oxidative Stress and Adverse Adipokine Profile Characterize the Metabolic Syndrome in Children. J Cardiometab Syndr. 2006;1(4):248-52. PubMed PMID: 17679810.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Oxidative stress and adverse adipokine profile characterize the metabolic syndrome in children. AU - Kelly,Aaron S, AU - Steinberger,Julia, AU - Kaiser,Daniel R, AU - Olson,Thomas P, AU - Bank,Alan J, AU - Dengel,Donald R, PY - 2007/8/8/pubmed PY - 2007/8/31/medline PY - 2007/8/8/entrez SP - 248 EP - 52 JF - Journal of the cardiometabolic syndrome JO - J Cardiometab Syndr VL - 1 IS - 4 N2 - Thirty-four children were assessed for body composition, blood pressure, lipids, glucose tolerance, markers of insulin resistance, oxidative stress, and adipokines. Children were divided into 3 groups: (1) normal weight, (2) overweight but otherwise healthy, and (3) overweight with the metabolic syndrome. There were no differences among any of the groups for age or Tanner stage, and anthropometric variables were similar between the overweight and the overweight with the metabolic syndrome groups. Differences across groups were found for high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (P < .001), triglycerides (P < .01), fasting insulin (P < .001), homeostasis model assessment (P < .01), adiponectin (P < .05), leptin (P < .0001), C-reactive protein (P < .0001), interleukin 6 (P < .0001), and 8-isoprostane (P < .001). In children, oxidative stress and adipokine levels worsen throughout the continuum of obesity and especially in the presence of components of the metabolic syndrome. Overweight children with components of the metabolic syndrome may be at elevated risk for future cardiovascular disease. SN - 1559-4564 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17679810/Oxidative_stress_and_adverse_adipokine_profile_characterize_the_metabolic_syndrome_in_children_ L2 - https://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/resolve/openurl?genre=article&amp;sid=nlm:pubmed&amp;issn=1559-4564&amp;date=2006&amp;volume=1&amp;issue=4&amp;spage=248 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -