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Human erythrovirus B19 and blood transfusion - an update.
Transfus Med. 2007 Aug; 17(4):263-78.TM

Abstract

Erythrovirus (parvovirus) B19 (B19) is a common human pathogen. It is a non-enveloped single-strand DNA virus packaging its genome in small tight capsids consisting of viral VP1 and VP2 proteins. It is now accepted that B19 is a relatively quickly evolving virus having diverged in several genetic variants recently identified. The main route of B19 transmission is respiratory, with a majority of infections occurring during childhood and manifesting as erythema infectiousum. B19 can also be transmitted vertically and via blood transfusion and organ transplantation. The majority of adult populations show immunological evidence of previous exposure to B19. Although the immune response is able to clear infection and provide life-long protection against B19, recent data suggest that in some, if not the majority, of individuals the acute phase of infection is followed by viral persistence in the blood or other tissues regardless of the host's immunocompetence. Transmission of B19 by blood and blood products and its resistance to common viral inactivation methods raises several blood safety questions, still unanswered. The diversity of B19 strains and the ability of the virus to persist in the presence of specific antibodies raise the issue of transmissibility by transfusion not so much to immunocompetent recipients but rather to the large proportion of recipients in whom there is some degree of immunodeficiency. The ability of the virus to reactivate in immunodeficient recipients may create difficulties in differentiating between transfusion transmission and reactivation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Transfusion Medicine, Department of Haematology, University of Cambridge, UK. ap402@cam.ac.ukNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17680952

Citation

Parsyan, A, and D Candotti. "Human Erythrovirus B19 and Blood Transfusion - an Update." Transfusion Medicine (Oxford, England), vol. 17, no. 4, 2007, pp. 263-78.
Parsyan A, Candotti D. Human erythrovirus B19 and blood transfusion - an update. Transfus Med. 2007;17(4):263-78.
Parsyan, A., & Candotti, D. (2007). Human erythrovirus B19 and blood transfusion - an update. Transfusion Medicine (Oxford, England), 17(4), 263-78.
Parsyan A, Candotti D. Human Erythrovirus B19 and Blood Transfusion - an Update. Transfus Med. 2007;17(4):263-78. PubMed PMID: 17680952.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Human erythrovirus B19 and blood transfusion - an update. AU - Parsyan,A, AU - Candotti,D, PY - 2007/8/8/pubmed PY - 2007/10/17/medline PY - 2007/8/8/entrez SP - 263 EP - 78 JF - Transfusion medicine (Oxford, England) JO - Transfus Med VL - 17 IS - 4 N2 - Erythrovirus (parvovirus) B19 (B19) is a common human pathogen. It is a non-enveloped single-strand DNA virus packaging its genome in small tight capsids consisting of viral VP1 and VP2 proteins. It is now accepted that B19 is a relatively quickly evolving virus having diverged in several genetic variants recently identified. The main route of B19 transmission is respiratory, with a majority of infections occurring during childhood and manifesting as erythema infectiousum. B19 can also be transmitted vertically and via blood transfusion and organ transplantation. The majority of adult populations show immunological evidence of previous exposure to B19. Although the immune response is able to clear infection and provide life-long protection against B19, recent data suggest that in some, if not the majority, of individuals the acute phase of infection is followed by viral persistence in the blood or other tissues regardless of the host's immunocompetence. Transmission of B19 by blood and blood products and its resistance to common viral inactivation methods raises several blood safety questions, still unanswered. The diversity of B19 strains and the ability of the virus to persist in the presence of specific antibodies raise the issue of transmissibility by transfusion not so much to immunocompetent recipients but rather to the large proportion of recipients in whom there is some degree of immunodeficiency. The ability of the virus to reactivate in immunodeficient recipients may create difficulties in differentiating between transfusion transmission and reactivation. SN - 0958-7578 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17680952/Human_erythrovirus_B19_and_blood_transfusion___an_update_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-3148.2007.00765.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -