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Statins and the risk of colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis of 18 studies involving more than 1.5 million patients.
J Clin Oncol. 2007 Aug 10; 25(23):3462-8.JC

Abstract

PURPOSE

Statins have been suggested to prevent colorectal cancer. Several epidemiologic studies have evaluated this association, whereas randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on cardiovascular outcomes provide relevant data as a secondary end point. Our aim was to examine the strength of this association through a detailed meta-analysis of the studies published on the subject in peer-reviewed literature.

METHODS

A comprehensive search for studies published up to December 2006 was performed, reviews of each study were conducted, and data were abstracted. Before meta-analysis, the studies were evaluated for publication bias and heterogeneity. Pooled relative risk (RR) estimates with 95% CIs were calculated using the fixed- and random-effects models.

RESULTS

Eighteen studies involving more than 1.5 million participants contributed to the analysis. They were grouped on the basis of study design, and separate meta-analyses were conducted. There was no evidence of an association between statin use and risk of colorectal cancer either among RCTs (RR = 0.95; 95% CI, 0.80 to 1.13; n = 6) or among cohort studies (RR = 0.96; 95% CI, 0.84 to 1.11; n = 3). However, statin use was associated with a modest reduction in the risk of colorectal cancer among case-control studies (RR = 0.91; 95% CI, 0.87 to 0.96; n = 9). Low evidence of publication bias or heterogeneity was found.

CONCLUSION

Our meta-analysis results do not support the hypothesis that statins strongly reduce the risk of colorectal cancer, when taken for management of hypercholesterolemia. However, we cannot rule out a modest reduction in risk or an effect associated with higher doses of statins.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Pharmacology, School of Medicine, University of Athens, Athens 11527, Greece. sbonovas@med.uoa.grNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Meta-Analysis

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17687150

Citation

Bonovas, Stefanos, et al. "Statins and the Risk of Colorectal Cancer: a Meta-analysis of 18 Studies Involving More Than 1.5 Million Patients." Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, vol. 25, no. 23, 2007, pp. 3462-8.
Bonovas S, Filioussi K, Flordellis CS, et al. Statins and the risk of colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis of 18 studies involving more than 1.5 million patients. J Clin Oncol. 2007;25(23):3462-8.
Bonovas, S., Filioussi, K., Flordellis, C. S., & Sitaras, N. M. (2007). Statins and the risk of colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis of 18 studies involving more than 1.5 million patients. Journal of Clinical Oncology : Official Journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology, 25(23), 3462-8.
Bonovas S, et al. Statins and the Risk of Colorectal Cancer: a Meta-analysis of 18 Studies Involving More Than 1.5 Million Patients. J Clin Oncol. 2007 Aug 10;25(23):3462-8. PubMed PMID: 17687150.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Statins and the risk of colorectal cancer: a meta-analysis of 18 studies involving more than 1.5 million patients. AU - Bonovas,Stefanos, AU - Filioussi,Kalitsa, AU - Flordellis,Christodoulos S, AU - Sitaras,Nikolaos M, PY - 2007/8/10/pubmed PY - 2007/8/31/medline PY - 2007/8/10/entrez SP - 3462 EP - 8 JF - Journal of clinical oncology : official journal of the American Society of Clinical Oncology JO - J. Clin. Oncol. VL - 25 IS - 23 N2 - PURPOSE: Statins have been suggested to prevent colorectal cancer. Several epidemiologic studies have evaluated this association, whereas randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on cardiovascular outcomes provide relevant data as a secondary end point. Our aim was to examine the strength of this association through a detailed meta-analysis of the studies published on the subject in peer-reviewed literature. METHODS: A comprehensive search for studies published up to December 2006 was performed, reviews of each study were conducted, and data were abstracted. Before meta-analysis, the studies were evaluated for publication bias and heterogeneity. Pooled relative risk (RR) estimates with 95% CIs were calculated using the fixed- and random-effects models. RESULTS: Eighteen studies involving more than 1.5 million participants contributed to the analysis. They were grouped on the basis of study design, and separate meta-analyses were conducted. There was no evidence of an association between statin use and risk of colorectal cancer either among RCTs (RR = 0.95; 95% CI, 0.80 to 1.13; n = 6) or among cohort studies (RR = 0.96; 95% CI, 0.84 to 1.11; n = 3). However, statin use was associated with a modest reduction in the risk of colorectal cancer among case-control studies (RR = 0.91; 95% CI, 0.87 to 0.96; n = 9). Low evidence of publication bias or heterogeneity was found. CONCLUSION: Our meta-analysis results do not support the hypothesis that statins strongly reduce the risk of colorectal cancer, when taken for management of hypercholesterolemia. However, we cannot rule out a modest reduction in risk or an effect associated with higher doses of statins. SN - 1527-7755 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17687150/Statins_and_the_risk_of_colorectal_cancer:_a_meta_analysis_of_18_studies_involving_more_than_1_5_million_patients_ L2 - http://ascopubs.org/doi/full/10.1200/JCO.2007.10.8936?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -