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Acrylamide in cereal and cereal products: a review on progress in level reduction.
Food Addit Contam. 2007; 24 Suppl 1:47-59.FA

Abstract

In March 2006, a joint workshop was organized by the European Commission and the Confederation of EU Food and Drink Industries (CIAA) to discuss current knowledge and achievements in the reduction of acrylamide levels. This paper focuses on the progress made with cereal products. At present, the reduction options available are applicable to a limited number of cereal products and are product-specific. The following are the most promising: * Adjustment of time and temperature during baking. * Extend fermentation times where feasible. * Substitution of ammonium bicarbonate with alternatives where feasible. * Avoid or minimise use of reducing sugars where possible. * Maintenance of uniform control of the colour and avoidance of very high baking temperature where possible. The most promising near-term technical solution is the use of asparaginase. This enzyme has the potential to achieve a 60-90% reduction for some products made from dough or batter, which can be held for a time. In the longer term, the optimisation of agronomy and plant breeding for wheat has the potential to reduce acrylamide in all foods on any scale, whether domestic or industrial. Importantly, nutritional and toxicological issues, other than acrylamide, must also be considered so as to ensure that the steps taken to reduce acrylamide levels do not have other adverse effects on diet.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Food and Consumer Product Safety Authority, Region South, Eindhoven, The Netherlands. erik.konings@vwa.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Review

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17687699

Citation

Konings, E J M., et al. "Acrylamide in Cereal and Cereal Products: a Review On Progress in Level Reduction." Food Additives and Contaminants, vol. 24 Suppl 1, 2007, pp. 47-59.
Konings EJ, Ashby P, Hamlet CG, et al. Acrylamide in cereal and cereal products: a review on progress in level reduction. Food Addit Contam. 2007;24 Suppl 1:47-59.
Konings, E. J., Ashby, P., Hamlet, C. G., & Thompson, G. A. (2007). Acrylamide in cereal and cereal products: a review on progress in level reduction. Food Additives and Contaminants, 24 Suppl 1, 47-59.
Konings EJ, et al. Acrylamide in Cereal and Cereal Products: a Review On Progress in Level Reduction. Food Addit Contam. 2007;24 Suppl 1:47-59. PubMed PMID: 17687699.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Acrylamide in cereal and cereal products: a review on progress in level reduction. AU - Konings,E J M, AU - Ashby,P, AU - Hamlet,C G, AU - Thompson,G A K, PY - 2007/9/22/pubmed PY - 2008/1/15/medline PY - 2007/9/22/entrez SP - 47 EP - 59 JF - Food additives and contaminants JO - Food Addit Contam VL - 24 Suppl 1 N2 - In March 2006, a joint workshop was organized by the European Commission and the Confederation of EU Food and Drink Industries (CIAA) to discuss current knowledge and achievements in the reduction of acrylamide levels. This paper focuses on the progress made with cereal products. At present, the reduction options available are applicable to a limited number of cereal products and are product-specific. The following are the most promising: * Adjustment of time and temperature during baking. * Extend fermentation times where feasible. * Substitution of ammonium bicarbonate with alternatives where feasible. * Avoid or minimise use of reducing sugars where possible. * Maintenance of uniform control of the colour and avoidance of very high baking temperature where possible. The most promising near-term technical solution is the use of asparaginase. This enzyme has the potential to achieve a 60-90% reduction for some products made from dough or batter, which can be held for a time. In the longer term, the optimisation of agronomy and plant breeding for wheat has the potential to reduce acrylamide in all foods on any scale, whether domestic or industrial. Importantly, nutritional and toxicological issues, other than acrylamide, must also be considered so as to ensure that the steps taken to reduce acrylamide levels do not have other adverse effects on diet. SN - 0265-203X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17687699/Acrylamide_in_cereal_and_cereal_products:_a_review_on_progress_in_level_reduction_ L2 - https://medlineplus.gov/foodborneillness.html DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -