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A prospective study of fruits, vegetables, and risk of endometrial cancer.

Abstract

Case-control studies support a lower risk of endometrial cancer associated with greater vegetable consumption but not fruit consumption. One prospective study suggested an inverse association with fruits and vegetables combined. The authors examined associations for vegetables and fruits separately among women in the American Cancer Society's Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort. After exclusions, 41,400 postmenopausal women completed a questionnaire on diet, lifestyle, and medical history at baseline in 1992-1993. Information on diet was updated in 1999; historical dietary information from 1982 was also available. The authors identified 435 eligible cases of endometrial cancer through 2003. In multivariate models, neither fruit consumption (top quintile vs. bottom: rate ratio (RR) = 1.24, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.90, 1.70; p-trend = 0.30) nor vegetable consumption (RR = 1.21, 95% CI: 0.89, 1.65; p-trend = 0.24) at baseline was associated with risk. Results were similar when diet was cumulatively updated. Only among women who had never used hormone replacement therapy was the risk of endometrial cancer lower in the highest (vs. lowest) tertile of fruit (RR = 0.75, 95% CI: 0.52, 1.07; p-interaction = 0.03, p-trend = 0.11) or vegetable (RR = 0.80, 95% CI: 0.57, 1.13; p-interaction = 0.01, p-trend = 0.29) consumption. This prospective study does not support an association between vegetable or fruit consumption and endometrial cancer.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Epidemiology and Surveillance Research Department, American Cancer Society, Atlanta, GA 30303-1002, USA. marji-mccullough@cancer.org

    , , , , , ,

    Source

    American journal of epidemiology 166:8 2007 Oct 15 pg 902-11

    MeSH

    Aged
    Cohort Studies
    Confidence Intervals
    Diet Surveys
    Endometrial Neoplasms
    Feeding Behavior
    Female
    Follow-Up Studies
    Fruit
    Hormone Replacement Therapy
    Humans
    Incidence
    Middle Aged
    Odds Ratio
    Prospective Studies
    Risk
    Risk Assessment
    Risk Factors
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    United States
    Vegetables

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    17690222

    Citation

    McCullough, Marjorie L., et al. "A Prospective Study of Fruits, Vegetables, and Risk of Endometrial Cancer." American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 166, no. 8, 2007, pp. 902-11.
    McCullough ML, Bandera EV, Patel R, et al. A prospective study of fruits, vegetables, and risk of endometrial cancer. Am J Epidemiol. 2007;166(8):902-11.
    McCullough, M. L., Bandera, E. V., Patel, R., Patel, A. V., Gansler, T., Kushi, L. H., ... Calle, E. E. (2007). A prospective study of fruits, vegetables, and risk of endometrial cancer. American Journal of Epidemiology, 166(8), pp. 902-11.
    McCullough ML, et al. A Prospective Study of Fruits, Vegetables, and Risk of Endometrial Cancer. Am J Epidemiol. 2007 Oct 15;166(8):902-11. PubMed PMID: 17690222.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - A prospective study of fruits, vegetables, and risk of endometrial cancer. AU - McCullough,Marjorie L, AU - Bandera,Elisa V, AU - Patel,Roshni, AU - Patel,Alpa V, AU - Gansler,Ted, AU - Kushi,Lawrence H, AU - Thun,Michael J, AU - Calle,Eugenia E, Y1 - 2007/08/09/ PY - 2007/8/11/pubmed PY - 2007/11/10/medline PY - 2007/8/11/entrez SP - 902 EP - 11 JF - American journal of epidemiology JO - Am. J. Epidemiol. VL - 166 IS - 8 N2 - Case-control studies support a lower risk of endometrial cancer associated with greater vegetable consumption but not fruit consumption. One prospective study suggested an inverse association with fruits and vegetables combined. The authors examined associations for vegetables and fruits separately among women in the American Cancer Society's Cancer Prevention Study II Nutrition Cohort. After exclusions, 41,400 postmenopausal women completed a questionnaire on diet, lifestyle, and medical history at baseline in 1992-1993. Information on diet was updated in 1999; historical dietary information from 1982 was also available. The authors identified 435 eligible cases of endometrial cancer through 2003. In multivariate models, neither fruit consumption (top quintile vs. bottom: rate ratio (RR) = 1.24, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.90, 1.70; p-trend = 0.30) nor vegetable consumption (RR = 1.21, 95% CI: 0.89, 1.65; p-trend = 0.24) at baseline was associated with risk. Results were similar when diet was cumulatively updated. Only among women who had never used hormone replacement therapy was the risk of endometrial cancer lower in the highest (vs. lowest) tertile of fruit (RR = 0.75, 95% CI: 0.52, 1.07; p-interaction = 0.03, p-trend = 0.11) or vegetable (RR = 0.80, 95% CI: 0.57, 1.13; p-interaction = 0.01, p-trend = 0.29) consumption. This prospective study does not support an association between vegetable or fruit consumption and endometrial cancer. SN - 0002-9262 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17690222/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/aje/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/aje/kwm156 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -