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Long-term morbidities following self-reported mild traumatic brain injury.
J Clin Exp Neuropsychol. 2007 Aug; 29(6):585-98.JC

Abstract

The objective of this study was to examine the prevalence of long-term psychiatric, neurologic, and psychosocial morbidities of self-reported mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). A cross-sectional cohort sample of three groups was examined: those who had not been injured in a motor vehicle accident nor had a MTBI (n = 3,214); those who had been injured in an accident but did not have a MTBI (n = 539); and those who had a MTBI with altered consciousness (n = 254). Logistic regression analyses were used to model odds ratios for the association between group and outcome variables while controlling demographic characteristics, comorbid medical conditions, and early-life psychiatric problems. Compared with uninjured controls, MTBI increased the likelihood of depression and postconcussion syndrome. MTBI also was associated with peripheral visual imperceptions and impaired tandem gait. Similarly, the MTBI group had poorer psychosocial outcomes including an increased likelihood of self-reported disability, underemployment, low income, and marital problems. Results suggest that MTBI can have adverse long-term psychiatric, neurologic, and psychosocial morbidities.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Mental Health and Behavioral Sciences, James A. Haley VAMC, Tampa, FL, USA. Rodney.Vanderploeg@med.va.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17691031

Citation

Vanderploeg, Rodney D., et al. "Long-term Morbidities Following Self-reported Mild Traumatic Brain Injury." Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, vol. 29, no. 6, 2007, pp. 585-98.
Vanderploeg RD, Curtiss G, Luis CA, et al. Long-term morbidities following self-reported mild traumatic brain injury. J Clin Exp Neuropsychol. 2007;29(6):585-98.
Vanderploeg, R. D., Curtiss, G., Luis, C. A., & Salazar, A. M. (2007). Long-term morbidities following self-reported mild traumatic brain injury. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 29(6), 585-98.
Vanderploeg RD, et al. Long-term Morbidities Following Self-reported Mild Traumatic Brain Injury. J Clin Exp Neuropsychol. 2007;29(6):585-98. PubMed PMID: 17691031.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Long-term morbidities following self-reported mild traumatic brain injury. AU - Vanderploeg,Rodney D, AU - Curtiss,Glenn, AU - Luis,Cheryl A, AU - Salazar,Andres M, PY - 2007/8/11/pubmed PY - 2007/12/6/medline PY - 2007/8/11/entrez SP - 585 EP - 98 JF - Journal of clinical and experimental neuropsychology JO - J Clin Exp Neuropsychol VL - 29 IS - 6 N2 - The objective of this study was to examine the prevalence of long-term psychiatric, neurologic, and psychosocial morbidities of self-reported mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI). A cross-sectional cohort sample of three groups was examined: those who had not been injured in a motor vehicle accident nor had a MTBI (n = 3,214); those who had been injured in an accident but did not have a MTBI (n = 539); and those who had a MTBI with altered consciousness (n = 254). Logistic regression analyses were used to model odds ratios for the association between group and outcome variables while controlling demographic characteristics, comorbid medical conditions, and early-life psychiatric problems. Compared with uninjured controls, MTBI increased the likelihood of depression and postconcussion syndrome. MTBI also was associated with peripheral visual imperceptions and impaired tandem gait. Similarly, the MTBI group had poorer psychosocial outcomes including an increased likelihood of self-reported disability, underemployment, low income, and marital problems. Results suggest that MTBI can have adverse long-term psychiatric, neurologic, and psychosocial morbidities. SN - 1380-3395 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17691031/Long_term_morbidities_following_self_reported_mild_traumatic_brain_injury_ DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -