Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

A 20-year cohort study of health gain from orthodontic treatment: psychological outcome.
Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2007 Aug; 132(2):146-57.AJ

Abstract

INTRODUCTION

Despite the widespread expectation that orthodontic treatment improves psychological well-being and self-esteem, there is little objective evidence to support this. The aim of this study was to compare the dental and psychosocial status of people who received, or did not receive, orthodontic treatment as teenagers.

METHODS

A prospective longitudinal cohort design was adopted. A multidisciplinary research team evaluated 1018 participants, aged 11 to 12 years, in 1981. Extensive assessments of dental health and psychosocial well-being were conducted; facial and dental photographs and plaster casts of dentition were obtained and rated for attractiveness and pretreatment need. No recommendations about orthodontic treatment were made, and an observational approach was adopted. At the third follow-up, 337 subjects (30-31 years old) were reexamined in 2001. One-way ANOVA was used to explore differences between the 4 groups (need/no need; treatment/no treatment).

RESULTS

The percentage changes in index of complexity, outcome and need scores for the 4 groups were need/no treatment (12.7%), no need/no treatment (-17.1%), need/treatment (31%), and no need/treatment (-11.4%). Participants with a prior need for orthodontic treatment as children who obtained treatment had better tooth alignment and satisfaction. However, when self-esteem at baseline was controlled for, orthodontic treatment had little positive impact on psychological health and quality of life in adulthood.

CONCLUSIONS

Lack of orthodontic treatment when there was need did not lead to psychological difficulties in later life.

Authors+Show Affiliations

School of Dentistry, University of Manchester, Manchester, United Kingdom. bill.shaw@manchester.ac.ukNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17693363

Citation

Shaw, William C., et al. "A 20-year Cohort Study of Health Gain From Orthodontic Treatment: Psychological Outcome." American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics : Official Publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, Its Constituent Societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics, vol. 132, no. 2, 2007, pp. 146-57.
Shaw WC, Richmond S, Kenealy PM, et al. A 20-year cohort study of health gain from orthodontic treatment: psychological outcome. Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2007;132(2):146-57.
Shaw, W. C., Richmond, S., Kenealy, P. M., Kingdon, A., & Worthington, H. (2007). A 20-year cohort study of health gain from orthodontic treatment: psychological outcome. American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics : Official Publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, Its Constituent Societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics, 132(2), 146-57.
Shaw WC, et al. A 20-year Cohort Study of Health Gain From Orthodontic Treatment: Psychological Outcome. Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop. 2007;132(2):146-57. PubMed PMID: 17693363.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A 20-year cohort study of health gain from orthodontic treatment: psychological outcome. AU - Shaw,William C, AU - Richmond,Stephen, AU - Kenealy,Pamela M, AU - Kingdon,Anne, AU - Worthington,Helen, PY - 2006/06/30/received PY - 2007/03/19/revised PY - 2007/04/03/accepted PY - 2007/8/19/pubmed PY - 2007/8/25/medline PY - 2007/8/19/entrez SP - 146 EP - 57 JF - American journal of orthodontics and dentofacial orthopedics : official publication of the American Association of Orthodontists, its constituent societies, and the American Board of Orthodontics JO - Am J Orthod Dentofacial Orthop VL - 132 IS - 2 N2 - INTRODUCTION: Despite the widespread expectation that orthodontic treatment improves psychological well-being and self-esteem, there is little objective evidence to support this. The aim of this study was to compare the dental and psychosocial status of people who received, or did not receive, orthodontic treatment as teenagers. METHODS: A prospective longitudinal cohort design was adopted. A multidisciplinary research team evaluated 1018 participants, aged 11 to 12 years, in 1981. Extensive assessments of dental health and psychosocial well-being were conducted; facial and dental photographs and plaster casts of dentition were obtained and rated for attractiveness and pretreatment need. No recommendations about orthodontic treatment were made, and an observational approach was adopted. At the third follow-up, 337 subjects (30-31 years old) were reexamined in 2001. One-way ANOVA was used to explore differences between the 4 groups (need/no need; treatment/no treatment). RESULTS: The percentage changes in index of complexity, outcome and need scores for the 4 groups were need/no treatment (12.7%), no need/no treatment (-17.1%), need/treatment (31%), and no need/treatment (-11.4%). Participants with a prior need for orthodontic treatment as children who obtained treatment had better tooth alignment and satisfaction. However, when self-esteem at baseline was controlled for, orthodontic treatment had little positive impact on psychological health and quality of life in adulthood. CONCLUSIONS: Lack of orthodontic treatment when there was need did not lead to psychological difficulties in later life. SN - 1097-6752 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17693363/A_20_year_cohort_study_of_health_gain_from_orthodontic_treatment:_psychological_outcome_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0889-5406(07)00450-7 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -