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HCV infection is a risk factor for gallstone disease in liver cirrhosis: an Italian epidemiological survey.
J Viral Hepat. 2007 Sep; 14(9):618-23.JV

Abstract

We assessed the prevalence of gallbladder disease (i.e. gallstones plus cholecystectomy) among patients with liver disease and its association with the severity and aetiology of hepatic injury. Subjects, referred to 79 Italian hospitals, were enrolled in a 6-month period. The independent effect of the severity and aetiology of liver disease on gallstone disease prevalence was assessed by multiple logistic regression analysis. Overall, 4867 subjects tested anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) positive alone, 839 were hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) alone, and 652 had an excessive alcohol intake. The prevalence of gallstone disease was 23.3% in anti-HCV-positive patients, 12.4% in HBsAg positive and 24.2% in subjects reporting excessive alcohol intake, respectively. Gallstone disease prevalence increased by age in each aetiological category. The proportion of patients with gallstone disease who had a cholecystectomy was the highest in HCV+ subjects. After adjusting for the confounding effect of age and body mass index, compared with patients with less severe liver disease, subjects with HCV-related cirrhosis, but not those with alcohol-related cirrhosis, were more likely to have gallstone disease. Subjects with HCV-related cirrhosis (OR 2.13, 95% CI: 1.38-3.26) were more likely to have gallstone disease when compared with those with HBV-related cirrhosis. HCV infection is a risk factor for gallstone disease. In Italy, the high prevalence of HCV infection among cirrhotic patients has important implications, as cholecystectomy in these subjects is associated with high risk of morbidity and mortality.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Laboratory of Epidemiology, Clinical Epidemiology Unit, Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome, Italy. tommaso.stroffolini@iss.itNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17697013

Citation

Stroffolini, T, et al. "HCV Infection Is a Risk Factor for Gallstone Disease in Liver Cirrhosis: an Italian Epidemiological Survey." Journal of Viral Hepatitis, vol. 14, no. 9, 2007, pp. 618-23.
Stroffolini T, Sagnelli E, Mele A, et al. HCV infection is a risk factor for gallstone disease in liver cirrhosis: an Italian epidemiological survey. J Viral Hepat. 2007;14(9):618-23.
Stroffolini, T., Sagnelli, E., Mele, A., Cottone, C., & Almasio, P. L. (2007). HCV infection is a risk factor for gallstone disease in liver cirrhosis: an Italian epidemiological survey. Journal of Viral Hepatitis, 14(9), 618-23.
Stroffolini T, et al. HCV Infection Is a Risk Factor for Gallstone Disease in Liver Cirrhosis: an Italian Epidemiological Survey. J Viral Hepat. 2007;14(9):618-23. PubMed PMID: 17697013.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - HCV infection is a risk factor for gallstone disease in liver cirrhosis: an Italian epidemiological survey. AU - Stroffolini,T, AU - Sagnelli,E, AU - Mele,A, AU - Cottone,C, AU - Almasio,P L, AU - ,, PY - 2007/8/19/pubmed PY - 2007/12/7/medline PY - 2007/8/19/entrez SP - 618 EP - 23 JF - Journal of viral hepatitis JO - J Viral Hepat VL - 14 IS - 9 N2 - We assessed the prevalence of gallbladder disease (i.e. gallstones plus cholecystectomy) among patients with liver disease and its association with the severity and aetiology of hepatic injury. Subjects, referred to 79 Italian hospitals, were enrolled in a 6-month period. The independent effect of the severity and aetiology of liver disease on gallstone disease prevalence was assessed by multiple logistic regression analysis. Overall, 4867 subjects tested anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) positive alone, 839 were hepatitis B virus surface antigen (HBsAg) alone, and 652 had an excessive alcohol intake. The prevalence of gallstone disease was 23.3% in anti-HCV-positive patients, 12.4% in HBsAg positive and 24.2% in subjects reporting excessive alcohol intake, respectively. Gallstone disease prevalence increased by age in each aetiological category. The proportion of patients with gallstone disease who had a cholecystectomy was the highest in HCV+ subjects. After adjusting for the confounding effect of age and body mass index, compared with patients with less severe liver disease, subjects with HCV-related cirrhosis, but not those with alcohol-related cirrhosis, were more likely to have gallstone disease. Subjects with HCV-related cirrhosis (OR 2.13, 95% CI: 1.38-3.26) were more likely to have gallstone disease when compared with those with HBV-related cirrhosis. HCV infection is a risk factor for gallstone disease. In Italy, the high prevalence of HCV infection among cirrhotic patients has important implications, as cholecystectomy in these subjects is associated with high risk of morbidity and mortality. SN - 1352-0504 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17697013/HCV_infection_is_a_risk_factor_for_gallstone_disease_in_liver_cirrhosis:_an_Italian_epidemiological_survey_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2893.2007.00845.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -