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Severe gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms in relation to anxiety, depression and coping in a population-based study.
Aliment Pharmacol Ther 2007; 26(5):683-91AP

Abstract

BACKGROUND

The association between psychiatric disorders and gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms is uncertain, and few population-based studies are available.

AIM

To examine the association between psychiatric and psychological factors and reflux symptoms.

METHODS

Population-based, cross-sectional, case-control study based on two health surveys conducted in the Norwegian county Nord-Trondelag in 1984-1986 and 1995-1997. Reflux symptoms were assessed in the second survey, including 65,333 participants (70% of the county's adult population). 3153 subjects reporting severe reflux symptoms were defined as cases and 40,210 subjects without symptoms were defined as controls. Data were collected in questionnaires. Odds ratio with 95% confidence intervals were estimated using unconditional logistic regression, in adjusted models.

RESULTS

Subjects reporting anxiety without depression had a 3.2-fold (95% CI: 2.7-3.8) increased risk of reflux, subjects with depression without anxiety had a 1.7-fold (95% CI: 1.4-2.1) increased risk and subjects with both anxiety and depression had a 2.8-fold (95% CI: 2.4-3.2) increased risk, compared to subjects without anxiety/depression. We observed a weak inverse association between one measure of covert coping and risk of reflux and a weak positive association between another coping measure and risk of reflux.

CONCLUSIONS

This population-based study indicates that anxiety and depression are strongly associated with reflux symptoms, while no consistent association regarding coping and reflux was found.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Unit of Esophageal and Gastric Research, Department of Molecular Medicine and Surgery, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. catarina.jansson@ki.seNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17697202

Citation

Jansson, C, et al. "Severe Gastro-oesophageal Reflux Symptoms in Relation to Anxiety, Depression and Coping in a Population-based Study." Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, vol. 26, no. 5, 2007, pp. 683-91.
Jansson C, Nordenstedt H, Wallander MA, et al. Severe gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms in relation to anxiety, depression and coping in a population-based study. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2007;26(5):683-91.
Jansson, C., Nordenstedt, H., Wallander, M. A., Johansson, S., Johnsen, R., Hveem, K., & Lagergren, J. (2007). Severe gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms in relation to anxiety, depression and coping in a population-based study. Alimentary Pharmacology & Therapeutics, 26(5), pp. 683-91.
Jansson C, et al. Severe Gastro-oesophageal Reflux Symptoms in Relation to Anxiety, Depression and Coping in a Population-based Study. Aliment Pharmacol Ther. 2007 Sep 1;26(5):683-91. PubMed PMID: 17697202.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Severe gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms in relation to anxiety, depression and coping in a population-based study. AU - Jansson,C, AU - Nordenstedt,H, AU - Wallander,M-A, AU - Johansson,S, AU - Johnsen,R, AU - Hveem,K, AU - Lagergren,J, PY - 2007/8/19/pubmed PY - 2007/12/28/medline PY - 2007/8/19/entrez SP - 683 EP - 91 JF - Alimentary pharmacology & therapeutics JO - Aliment. Pharmacol. Ther. VL - 26 IS - 5 N2 - BACKGROUND: The association between psychiatric disorders and gastro-oesophageal reflux symptoms is uncertain, and few population-based studies are available. AIM: To examine the association between psychiatric and psychological factors and reflux symptoms. METHODS: Population-based, cross-sectional, case-control study based on two health surveys conducted in the Norwegian county Nord-Trondelag in 1984-1986 and 1995-1997. Reflux symptoms were assessed in the second survey, including 65,333 participants (70% of the county's adult population). 3153 subjects reporting severe reflux symptoms were defined as cases and 40,210 subjects without symptoms were defined as controls. Data were collected in questionnaires. Odds ratio with 95% confidence intervals were estimated using unconditional logistic regression, in adjusted models. RESULTS: Subjects reporting anxiety without depression had a 3.2-fold (95% CI: 2.7-3.8) increased risk of reflux, subjects with depression without anxiety had a 1.7-fold (95% CI: 1.4-2.1) increased risk and subjects with both anxiety and depression had a 2.8-fold (95% CI: 2.4-3.2) increased risk, compared to subjects without anxiety/depression. We observed a weak inverse association between one measure of covert coping and risk of reflux and a weak positive association between another coping measure and risk of reflux. CONCLUSIONS: This population-based study indicates that anxiety and depression are strongly associated with reflux symptoms, while no consistent association regarding coping and reflux was found. SN - 0269-2813 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17697202/Severe_gastro_oesophageal_reflux_symptoms_in_relation_to_anxiety_depression_and_coping_in_a_population_based_study_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2036.2007.03411.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -