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A randomized, controlled trial of lactic acid bacteria for idiopathic hyperoxaluria.
Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2007 Jul; 2(4):745-9.CJ

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Urinary oxalate excretion is an important contributor to calcium oxalate stone formation. Methods of reducing oxalate excretion are not wholly satisfactory, and no controlled trials using them have been performed to prevent stone recurrence. Some lactic acid bacteria can degrade oxalate in vitro. This study sought to reduce urinary oxalate excretion in calcium stone formers with idiopathic hyperoxaluria.

DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, AND MEASUREMENTS

A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was performed of Oxadrop, a mix of four lactic acid bacterium species. This preparation previously reduced oxalate excretion in stone formers with idiopathic and enteric hyperoxaluria. Patients were selected from two stone prevention clinics. Twenty people with calcium stones and idiopathic hyperoxaluria (>40 mg/d) were enrolled and randomly assigned 1:1 in placebo and active preparation arms. Both groups took 3.6 g of granulate each day: Either placebo or the experimental preparation. Participants performed two consecutive 24-h urine collections at baseline, at 28 d of therapy, and at 56 d, after being off the preparation for 4 wk. Diet was replicated at each point.

RESULTS

There was no effect of the study preparation: Mean 24-h urinary oxalate excretion in placebo-treated patients was 73.9 mg at baseline and 72.7 mg after treatment, whereas the Oxadrop-treated patients had 59.1 mg at baseline and 55.4 mg after treatment. The preparation was well tolerated; three participants on active treatment experienced mild constipation.

CONCLUSIONS

In this randomized, placebo-controlled trial, Oxadrop did not reduce urinary oxalate excretion in participants with idiopathic hyperoxaluria.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Nephrology Section, New York Harbor VA Medical Center and New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY 10010, USA. david.goldfarb@med.va.govNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Randomized Controlled Trial
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17699491

Citation

Goldfarb, David S., et al. "A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Lactic Acid Bacteria for Idiopathic Hyperoxaluria." Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : CJASN, vol. 2, no. 4, 2007, pp. 745-9.
Goldfarb DS, Modersitzki F, Asplin JR. A randomized, controlled trial of lactic acid bacteria for idiopathic hyperoxaluria. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2007;2(4):745-9.
Goldfarb, D. S., Modersitzki, F., & Asplin, J. R. (2007). A randomized, controlled trial of lactic acid bacteria for idiopathic hyperoxaluria. Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology : CJASN, 2(4), 745-9.
Goldfarb DS, Modersitzki F, Asplin JR. A Randomized, Controlled Trial of Lactic Acid Bacteria for Idiopathic Hyperoxaluria. Clin J Am Soc Nephrol. 2007;2(4):745-9. PubMed PMID: 17699491.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - A randomized, controlled trial of lactic acid bacteria for idiopathic hyperoxaluria. AU - Goldfarb,David S, AU - Modersitzki,Frank, AU - Asplin,John R, Y1 - 2007/05/30/ PY - 2007/8/21/pubmed PY - 2007/9/26/medline PY - 2007/8/21/entrez SP - 745 EP - 9 JF - Clinical journal of the American Society of Nephrology : CJASN JO - Clin J Am Soc Nephrol VL - 2 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: Urinary oxalate excretion is an important contributor to calcium oxalate stone formation. Methods of reducing oxalate excretion are not wholly satisfactory, and no controlled trials using them have been performed to prevent stone recurrence. Some lactic acid bacteria can degrade oxalate in vitro. This study sought to reduce urinary oxalate excretion in calcium stone formers with idiopathic hyperoxaluria. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS, AND MEASUREMENTS: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was performed of Oxadrop, a mix of four lactic acid bacterium species. This preparation previously reduced oxalate excretion in stone formers with idiopathic and enteric hyperoxaluria. Patients were selected from two stone prevention clinics. Twenty people with calcium stones and idiopathic hyperoxaluria (>40 mg/d) were enrolled and randomly assigned 1:1 in placebo and active preparation arms. Both groups took 3.6 g of granulate each day: Either placebo or the experimental preparation. Participants performed two consecutive 24-h urine collections at baseline, at 28 d of therapy, and at 56 d, after being off the preparation for 4 wk. Diet was replicated at each point. RESULTS: There was no effect of the study preparation: Mean 24-h urinary oxalate excretion in placebo-treated patients was 73.9 mg at baseline and 72.7 mg after treatment, whereas the Oxadrop-treated patients had 59.1 mg at baseline and 55.4 mg after treatment. The preparation was well tolerated; three participants on active treatment experienced mild constipation. CONCLUSIONS: In this randomized, placebo-controlled trial, Oxadrop did not reduce urinary oxalate excretion in participants with idiopathic hyperoxaluria. SN - 1555-905X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17699491/A_randomized_controlled_trial_of_lactic_acid_bacteria_for_idiopathic_hyperoxaluria_ L2 - https://cjasn.asnjournals.org/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&pmid=17699491 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -