Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Alcohol consumption of Australian women: results from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health.

Abstract

INTRODUCTION AND AIMS

Alcohol misuse is responsible for extensive personal harm and high societal costs. Research related specifically to women's alcohol consumption is important due to gender differences in clinical outcomes and disease progression.

DESIGN AND METHODS

This study examines longitudinal changes in the patterns of alcohol consumption associated with harm in the long term (chronic) and short term (acute) as defined by the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council. Results are presented for three age cohorts (18 - 23 years, 45 - 50 years and 70 - 75 years) using data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health 1996 - 2003. Initial response rates for the study were 41%, 54% and 36% for the Younger, Mid-aged and Older cohort, respectively.

RESULTS

The percentages of women that initiated usual weekly consumption in excess of 140 g of alcohol, designated as long-term risky or high risk consumption, between surveys 1 and 2 were 2.7%, 2.1% and 1.7% (Younger, Mid-aged and Older cohorts, respectively). Similarly, between surveys 1 and 2, 7.8% of younger women and 2.5% of mid-aged women initiated consumption of 50 g of alcohol on one occasion at least weekly, placing them at risk of alcohol-related harm in the short-term weekly. Examining data across the three time-points in the Younger cohort, 0.3% of women were at risk of alcohol-related harm in the long term across all three time-points, and 9.2% were at risk at one or two time-points. The percentage of younger women at risk of alcohol-related harm in the short term at least weekly was 3.4% at risk at all three time-points and 24% at risk at one or two time-points.

DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS

This study indicates that there is a small percentage of women who maintain levels of alcohol consumption associated with increased risk of morbidity and mortality over time, but a much larger proportion of women that drink at hazardous levels sporadically during the life course. Prevention efforts may need to target transient high-risk alcohol consumers differently than consistently heavy alcohol consumers. Non-response bias and attrition may have caused the prevalence of both entrenched and episodic heavy consumption to be underestimated.

Links

  • Publisher Full Text
  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Turning Point Alcohol and Drug Centre, Australia. susanc@turningpoint.org.au

    , ,

    Source

    Drug and alcohol review 26:5 2007 Sep pg 525-35

    MeSH

    Adolescent
    Adult
    Age Factors
    Aged
    Alcohol Drinking
    Alcohol-Related Disorders
    Alcoholic Intoxication
    Australia
    Bias
    Cohort Studies
    Evidence-Based Medicine
    Female
    Health Promotion
    Humans
    Longitudinal Studies
    Middle Aged
    Risk Assessment
    Risk-Taking
    Time Factors
    Women's Health

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    17701516

    Citation

    Clemens, Susan L., et al. "Alcohol Consumption of Australian Women: Results From the Australian Longitudinal Study On Women's Health." Drug and Alcohol Review, vol. 26, no. 5, 2007, pp. 525-35.
    Clemens SL, Matthews SL, Young AF, et al. Alcohol consumption of Australian women: results from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. Drug Alcohol Rev. 2007;26(5):525-35.
    Clemens, S. L., Matthews, S. L., Young, A. F., & Powers, J. R. (2007). Alcohol consumption of Australian women: results from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. Drug and Alcohol Review, 26(5), pp. 525-35.
    Clemens SL, et al. Alcohol Consumption of Australian Women: Results From the Australian Longitudinal Study On Women's Health. Drug Alcohol Rev. 2007;26(5):525-35. PubMed PMID: 17701516.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Alcohol consumption of Australian women: results from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health. AU - Clemens,Susan L, AU - Matthews,Sharon L, AU - Young,Anne F, AU - Powers,Jennifer R, PY - 2007/8/19/pubmed PY - 2007/12/6/medline PY - 2007/8/19/entrez SP - 525 EP - 35 JF - Drug and alcohol review JO - Drug Alcohol Rev VL - 26 IS - 5 N2 - INTRODUCTION AND AIMS: Alcohol misuse is responsible for extensive personal harm and high societal costs. Research related specifically to women's alcohol consumption is important due to gender differences in clinical outcomes and disease progression. DESIGN AND METHODS: This study examines longitudinal changes in the patterns of alcohol consumption associated with harm in the long term (chronic) and short term (acute) as defined by the Australian National Health and Medical Research Council. Results are presented for three age cohorts (18 - 23 years, 45 - 50 years and 70 - 75 years) using data from the Australian Longitudinal Study on Women's Health 1996 - 2003. Initial response rates for the study were 41%, 54% and 36% for the Younger, Mid-aged and Older cohort, respectively. RESULTS: The percentages of women that initiated usual weekly consumption in excess of 140 g of alcohol, designated as long-term risky or high risk consumption, between surveys 1 and 2 were 2.7%, 2.1% and 1.7% (Younger, Mid-aged and Older cohorts, respectively). Similarly, between surveys 1 and 2, 7.8% of younger women and 2.5% of mid-aged women initiated consumption of 50 g of alcohol on one occasion at least weekly, placing them at risk of alcohol-related harm in the short-term weekly. Examining data across the three time-points in the Younger cohort, 0.3% of women were at risk of alcohol-related harm in the long term across all three time-points, and 9.2% were at risk at one or two time-points. The percentage of younger women at risk of alcohol-related harm in the short term at least weekly was 3.4% at risk at all three time-points and 24% at risk at one or two time-points. DISCUSSION AND CONCLUSIONS: This study indicates that there is a small percentage of women who maintain levels of alcohol consumption associated with increased risk of morbidity and mortality over time, but a much larger proportion of women that drink at hazardous levels sporadically during the life course. Prevention efforts may need to target transient high-risk alcohol consumers differently than consistently heavy alcohol consumers. Non-response bias and attrition may have caused the prevalence of both entrenched and episodic heavy consumption to be underestimated. SN - 0959-5236 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17701516/Alcohol_consumption_of_Australian_women:_results_from_the_Australian_Longitudinal_Study_on_Women's_Health_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1080/09595230701499142 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -