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Visceral and somatic hypersensitivity in TNBS-induced colitis in rats.
Dig Dis Sci 2008; 53(2):429-35DD

Abstract

Inflammation of visceral structures in rats has been shown to produce visceral/somatic hyperalgesia. Our objectives were to determine if trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) induced colitis in rats leads to visceral/somatic hypersensitivity. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (200-250 g) were treated with 20 mg of TNBS in 50% ethanol (n = 40) or an equivalent volume of ethanol (n = 40) or saline (n = 25) via the colon. Colonic distension, Von Frey, Hargreaves, and tail reflex tests were used to evaluate for visceral, mechanical, and thermal sensitivity. The rats demonstrated visceral hypersensitivity at 2-28 days following TNBS administration (P < 0.0001). The ethanol-treated rats also demonstrated visceral hypersensitivity that resolved after day 14. TNBS-treated rats demonstrated somatic hypersensitivity at days 14-28 (P < 0.0001) in response to somatic stimuli of the hind paw. TNBS colitis is associated with visceral and somatic hypersensitivity in areas of somatotopic overlap. This model of colitis should allow further investigation into the mechanisms of visceral and somatic hypersensitivity.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Division of Gastroenterology, Hepatology, and Nutrition, Department of Medicine, University of Florida College of Medicine, 1600 SW Archer Road, HD 602, Gainesville, FL 32610-0214, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17703363

Citation

Zhou, QiQi, et al. "Visceral and Somatic Hypersensitivity in TNBS-induced Colitis in Rats." Digestive Diseases and Sciences, vol. 53, no. 2, 2008, pp. 429-35.
Zhou Q, Price DD, Caudle RM, et al. Visceral and somatic hypersensitivity in TNBS-induced colitis in rats. Dig Dis Sci. 2008;53(2):429-35.
Zhou, Q., Price, D. D., Caudle, R. M., & Verne, G. N. (2008). Visceral and somatic hypersensitivity in TNBS-induced colitis in rats. Digestive Diseases and Sciences, 53(2), pp. 429-35.
Zhou Q, et al. Visceral and Somatic Hypersensitivity in TNBS-induced Colitis in Rats. Dig Dis Sci. 2008;53(2):429-35. PubMed PMID: 17703363.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Visceral and somatic hypersensitivity in TNBS-induced colitis in rats. AU - Zhou,QiQi, AU - Price,Donald D, AU - Caudle,Robert M, AU - Verne,G Nicholas, Y1 - 2007/08/17/ PY - 2007/02/14/received PY - 2007/05/14/accepted PY - 2007/8/19/pubmed PY - 2008/3/28/medline PY - 2007/8/19/entrez SP - 429 EP - 35 JF - Digestive diseases and sciences JO - Dig. Dis. Sci. VL - 53 IS - 2 N2 - Inflammation of visceral structures in rats has been shown to produce visceral/somatic hyperalgesia. Our objectives were to determine if trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (TNBS) induced colitis in rats leads to visceral/somatic hypersensitivity. Male Sprague-Dawley rats (200-250 g) were treated with 20 mg of TNBS in 50% ethanol (n = 40) or an equivalent volume of ethanol (n = 40) or saline (n = 25) via the colon. Colonic distension, Von Frey, Hargreaves, and tail reflex tests were used to evaluate for visceral, mechanical, and thermal sensitivity. The rats demonstrated visceral hypersensitivity at 2-28 days following TNBS administration (P < 0.0001). The ethanol-treated rats also demonstrated visceral hypersensitivity that resolved after day 14. TNBS-treated rats demonstrated somatic hypersensitivity at days 14-28 (P < 0.0001) in response to somatic stimuli of the hind paw. TNBS colitis is associated with visceral and somatic hypersensitivity in areas of somatotopic overlap. This model of colitis should allow further investigation into the mechanisms of visceral and somatic hypersensitivity. SN - 0163-2116 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17703363/Visceral_and_somatic_hypersensitivity_in_TNBS_induced_colitis_in_rats_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1007/s10620-007-9881-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -