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Effects of a Taiji and Qigong intervention on the antibody response to influenza vaccine in older adults.
Am J Chin Med 2007; 35(4):597-607AJ

Abstract

Previous studies have suggested that Taiji practice may improve immune function. This study was intended to examine whether 5 months of moderate Taiji and Qigong (TQ) practice could improve the immune response to influenza vaccine in older adults. Fifty older adults (mean age 77.2 +/- 1.3 years) participated in this study (TQ N = 27; wait-list control [CON] N = 23). Baseline pre-vaccine blood samples were collected. All subjects then received the 2003-2004 influenza vaccine during the first week of the intervention. Post-vaccine blood samples were collected 3, 6 and 20 weeks post-intervention for analysis of anti-influenza hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titers. We found a significant (p < 0.05) increase in the magnitude and duration of the antibody response to influenza vaccine in TQ participants when compared to CON. The vaccination resulted in a 173, 130, and 109% increase in HI titer at 3, 6, and 20 weeks post-vaccine, respectively, in the TQ group compared to 58, 54, and 10% in CON. There was a significant between group difference at 3 and 20 weeks post-vaccine and at 20 weeks the TQ group had significantly higher titers compared to the pre-vaccine time point, whereas the CON group did not. A higher percentage of TQ subjects also responded to the influenza A strains with a protective (> 40HI) antibody response (37% TQ vs. 20% CON for the H1N1 strain and 56% TQ vs. 45% CON for the H3N2 strain), but the differences between groups were not statistically significant. Traditional TQ practice improves the antibody response to influenza vaccine in older adults, but further study is needed to determine whether the enhanced response is sufficient to provide definitive protection from influenza infection.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Kinesiology and Community Health, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801, USA. yyang5@uiuc.eduNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Controlled Clinical Trial
Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17708626

Citation

Yang, Yang, et al. "Effects of a Taiji and Qigong Intervention On the Antibody Response to Influenza Vaccine in Older Adults." The American Journal of Chinese Medicine, vol. 35, no. 4, 2007, pp. 597-607.
Yang Y, Verkuilen J, Rosengren KS, et al. Effects of a Taiji and Qigong intervention on the antibody response to influenza vaccine in older adults. Am J Chin Med. 2007;35(4):597-607.
Yang, Y., Verkuilen, J., Rosengren, K. S., Mariani, R. A., Reed, M., Grubisich, S. A., & Woods, J. A. (2007). Effects of a Taiji and Qigong intervention on the antibody response to influenza vaccine in older adults. The American Journal of Chinese Medicine, 35(4), pp. 597-607.
Yang Y, et al. Effects of a Taiji and Qigong Intervention On the Antibody Response to Influenza Vaccine in Older Adults. Am J Chin Med. 2007;35(4):597-607. PubMed PMID: 17708626.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of a Taiji and Qigong intervention on the antibody response to influenza vaccine in older adults. AU - Yang,Yang, AU - Verkuilen,Jay, AU - Rosengren,Karl S, AU - Mariani,Rachel A, AU - Reed,Michael, AU - Grubisich,Scott A, AU - Woods,Jeffrey A, PY - 2007/8/22/pubmed PY - 2007/11/6/medline PY - 2007/8/22/entrez SP - 597 EP - 607 JF - The American journal of Chinese medicine JO - Am. J. Chin. Med. VL - 35 IS - 4 N2 - Previous studies have suggested that Taiji practice may improve immune function. This study was intended to examine whether 5 months of moderate Taiji and Qigong (TQ) practice could improve the immune response to influenza vaccine in older adults. Fifty older adults (mean age 77.2 +/- 1.3 years) participated in this study (TQ N = 27; wait-list control [CON] N = 23). Baseline pre-vaccine blood samples were collected. All subjects then received the 2003-2004 influenza vaccine during the first week of the intervention. Post-vaccine blood samples were collected 3, 6 and 20 weeks post-intervention for analysis of anti-influenza hemagglutination inhibition (HI) titers. We found a significant (p < 0.05) increase in the magnitude and duration of the antibody response to influenza vaccine in TQ participants when compared to CON. The vaccination resulted in a 173, 130, and 109% increase in HI titer at 3, 6, and 20 weeks post-vaccine, respectively, in the TQ group compared to 58, 54, and 10% in CON. There was a significant between group difference at 3 and 20 weeks post-vaccine and at 20 weeks the TQ group had significantly higher titers compared to the pre-vaccine time point, whereas the CON group did not. A higher percentage of TQ subjects also responded to the influenza A strains with a protective (> 40HI) antibody response (37% TQ vs. 20% CON for the H1N1 strain and 56% TQ vs. 45% CON for the H3N2 strain), but the differences between groups were not statistically significant. Traditional TQ practice improves the antibody response to influenza vaccine in older adults, but further study is needed to determine whether the enhanced response is sufficient to provide definitive protection from influenza infection. SN - 0192-415X UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17708626/Effects_of_a_Taiji_and_Qigong_intervention_on_the_antibody_response_to_influenza_vaccine_in_older_adults_ L2 - https://www.worldscientific.com/doi/full/10.1142/S0192415X07005090?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&amp;rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&amp;rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -