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Outcome of liver transplantation in septuagenarians: a single-center experience.
Arch Surg 2007; 142(8):775-81; discussion 781-4AS

Abstract

HYPOTHESIS

We hypothesized that selected septuagenarians may do as well after transplantation as those of a younger group of older recipients. This work compares post-liver transplant survival in septuagenarians with that of patients aged 50 to 59 years.

DESIGN

Review of a prospectively maintained database.

SETTING

University transplant center.

PATIENTS

First-time liver transplant recipients treated from January 1, 1988, to December 31, 2005. Group 1 consisted of liver transplant recipients aged 70 years or older at the time of transplant. Group 2 was a younger cohort of patients aged 50 to 59 years.

INTERVENTIONS

Liver transplantation.

MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES

Patient survival. Survival data were stratified, Kaplan-Meier survival was calculated, and a multivariate analysis was performed.

RESULTS

Group 1 included 62 patients aged 70 years or older (average, 71.9 +/- 2.1 years). Group 2 included 864 patients aged 50 to 59 years (average, 54.3 +/- 2.9 years). Unadjusted patient survival of group 1 at 1, 3, 5, and 10 years was 73.3%, 65.8%, 47.1%, and 39.7%, respectively. Unadjusted patient survival of group 2 at 1, 3, 5, and 10 years was 79.4%, 71.5%, 65.3%, and 45.2%, respectively. The difference was not statistically significant (P = .14). Multivariate analysis for factors affecting survival demonstrated preoperative hospitalization, cold ischemia time, and hepatitis C/ethanol as risk factors for death. Age 70 years or more was not a strong risk factor (mortality ratio, 1.28; P = .27).

CONCLUSIONS

When other risk factors for mortality are controlled in older recipients, risk of death due to age is reduced in well-selected recipients. Age by itself should not be used to limit liver transplantation.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Center for Surgical Outcomes and Quality, Department of Surgery, David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Room 77-120 CHS, Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17709732

Citation

Lipshutz, Gerald S., et al. "Outcome of Liver Transplantation in Septuagenarians: a Single-center Experience." Archives of Surgery (Chicago, Ill. : 1960), vol. 142, no. 8, 2007, pp. 775-81; discussion 781-4.
Lipshutz GS, Hiatt J, Ghobrial RM, et al. Outcome of liver transplantation in septuagenarians: a single-center experience. Arch Surg. 2007;142(8):775-81; discussion 781-4.
Lipshutz, G. S., Hiatt, J., Ghobrial, R. M., Farmer, D. G., Martinez, M. M., Yersiz, H., ... Busuttil, R. W. (2007). Outcome of liver transplantation in septuagenarians: a single-center experience. Archives of Surgery (Chicago, Ill. : 1960), 142(8), pp. 775-81; discussion 781-4.
Lipshutz GS, et al. Outcome of Liver Transplantation in Septuagenarians: a Single-center Experience. Arch Surg. 2007;142(8):775-81; discussion 781-4. PubMed PMID: 17709732.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Outcome of liver transplantation in septuagenarians: a single-center experience. AU - Lipshutz,Gerald S, AU - Hiatt,Jonathan, AU - Ghobrial,R Mark, AU - Farmer,Douglas G, AU - Martinez,Monica M, AU - Yersiz,Hasan, AU - Gornbein,Jeffrey, AU - Busuttil,Ronald W, PY - 2007/8/22/pubmed PY - 2007/9/19/medline PY - 2007/8/22/entrez SP - 775-81; discussion 781-4 JF - Archives of surgery (Chicago, Ill. : 1960) JO - Arch Surg VL - 142 IS - 8 N2 - HYPOTHESIS: We hypothesized that selected septuagenarians may do as well after transplantation as those of a younger group of older recipients. This work compares post-liver transplant survival in septuagenarians with that of patients aged 50 to 59 years. DESIGN: Review of a prospectively maintained database. SETTING: University transplant center. PATIENTS: First-time liver transplant recipients treated from January 1, 1988, to December 31, 2005. Group 1 consisted of liver transplant recipients aged 70 years or older at the time of transplant. Group 2 was a younger cohort of patients aged 50 to 59 years. INTERVENTIONS: Liver transplantation. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Patient survival. Survival data were stratified, Kaplan-Meier survival was calculated, and a multivariate analysis was performed. RESULTS: Group 1 included 62 patients aged 70 years or older (average, 71.9 +/- 2.1 years). Group 2 included 864 patients aged 50 to 59 years (average, 54.3 +/- 2.9 years). Unadjusted patient survival of group 1 at 1, 3, 5, and 10 years was 73.3%, 65.8%, 47.1%, and 39.7%, respectively. Unadjusted patient survival of group 2 at 1, 3, 5, and 10 years was 79.4%, 71.5%, 65.3%, and 45.2%, respectively. The difference was not statistically significant (P = .14). Multivariate analysis for factors affecting survival demonstrated preoperative hospitalization, cold ischemia time, and hepatitis C/ethanol as risk factors for death. Age 70 years or more was not a strong risk factor (mortality ratio, 1.28; P = .27). CONCLUSIONS: When other risk factors for mortality are controlled in older recipients, risk of death due to age is reduced in well-selected recipients. Age by itself should not be used to limit liver transplantation. SN - 0004-0010 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17709732/Outcome_of_liver_transplantation_in_septuagenarians:_a_single_center_experience_ L2 - https://jamanetwork.com/journals/jamasurgery/fullarticle/10.1001/archsurg.142.8.775 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -