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In vitro antifungal susceptibility patterns of dermatophyte strains causing tinea unguium.
Clin Exp Dermatol. 2007 Nov; 32(6):675-9.CE

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Dermatophytes are the major responsible organisms in onychomycosis. Although recent antifungal agents have high success rates in treating this condition, lack of clinical response may occur in 20%. Antifungal drug resistance may be one of the causes of treatment failure. The need for in vitro antifungal drug resistance in daily practice is still under discussion.

OBJECTIVE

We aimed to determine the in vitro susceptibility patterns of dermatophytes causing onychomycosis, against the traditionally available systemic antifungal agents terbinafine, itraconazole and fluconazole.

METHODS

In total, 100 otherwise healthy patients with suspected onychomycosis were included. Nail clippings were cultured on Sabouraud dexrose agar, mycobiotic agar and dermatophyte test medium. Antifungal susceptibility tests were carried out, mainly following The National Committee for Clinical and Laboratory Standards (M38-P) protocol standard for filamentous fungi. Different concentrations of terbinafine (0.008-8 microg/mL), itraconazole (0.015-16 microg/mL) and fluconazole (0.06-64 microg/mL) were tested. Minimum inhibitory concentration end-point determination was chosen as 100% growth inhibition for terbinafine and 80% for azoles.

RESULTS

Of the 100 nail samples, 43% grew dermatophytes. The main causative organism was Trichophyton rubrum (91%) followed by Trichophyton mentagrophytes (9%). Terbinafine had the lowest minimum inhibitory concentration (0.008 microg/mL) followed by itraconazole. Fluconazole showed the greatest variation in minimum inhibitory concentration (0.03-2 microg/mL) and had different susceptibility patterns for the two species.

CONCLUSIONS

Of the three antifungals tested, terbinafine had the most potent in vitro antifungal activity against dermatophytes. Antifungal susceptibility tests would be useful to screen antifungal-resistant dermatophyte strains.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Dermatology, Başkent University Faculty of Medicine, Ankara, Turkey. evrenmd@yahoo.comNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17714532

Citation

Sarifakioglu, E, et al. "In Vitro Antifungal Susceptibility Patterns of Dermatophyte Strains Causing Tinea Unguium." Clinical and Experimental Dermatology, vol. 32, no. 6, 2007, pp. 675-9.
Sarifakioglu E, Seçkin D, Demirbilek M, et al. In vitro antifungal susceptibility patterns of dermatophyte strains causing tinea unguium. Clin Exp Dermatol. 2007;32(6):675-9.
Sarifakioglu, E., Seçkin, D., Demirbilek, M., & Can, F. (2007). In vitro antifungal susceptibility patterns of dermatophyte strains causing tinea unguium. Clinical and Experimental Dermatology, 32(6), 675-9.
Sarifakioglu E, et al. In Vitro Antifungal Susceptibility Patterns of Dermatophyte Strains Causing Tinea Unguium. Clin Exp Dermatol. 2007;32(6):675-9. PubMed PMID: 17714532.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - In vitro antifungal susceptibility patterns of dermatophyte strains causing tinea unguium. AU - Sarifakioglu,E, AU - Seçkin,D, AU - Demirbilek,M, AU - Can,F, Y1 - 2007/08/22/ PY - 2007/8/24/pubmed PY - 2008/4/4/medline PY - 2007/8/24/entrez SP - 675 EP - 9 JF - Clinical and experimental dermatology JO - Clin Exp Dermatol VL - 32 IS - 6 N2 - BACKGROUND: Dermatophytes are the major responsible organisms in onychomycosis. Although recent antifungal agents have high success rates in treating this condition, lack of clinical response may occur in 20%. Antifungal drug resistance may be one of the causes of treatment failure. The need for in vitro antifungal drug resistance in daily practice is still under discussion. OBJECTIVE: We aimed to determine the in vitro susceptibility patterns of dermatophytes causing onychomycosis, against the traditionally available systemic antifungal agents terbinafine, itraconazole and fluconazole. METHODS: In total, 100 otherwise healthy patients with suspected onychomycosis were included. Nail clippings were cultured on Sabouraud dexrose agar, mycobiotic agar and dermatophyte test medium. Antifungal susceptibility tests were carried out, mainly following The National Committee for Clinical and Laboratory Standards (M38-P) protocol standard for filamentous fungi. Different concentrations of terbinafine (0.008-8 microg/mL), itraconazole (0.015-16 microg/mL) and fluconazole (0.06-64 microg/mL) were tested. Minimum inhibitory concentration end-point determination was chosen as 100% growth inhibition for terbinafine and 80% for azoles. RESULTS: Of the 100 nail samples, 43% grew dermatophytes. The main causative organism was Trichophyton rubrum (91%) followed by Trichophyton mentagrophytes (9%). Terbinafine had the lowest minimum inhibitory concentration (0.008 microg/mL) followed by itraconazole. Fluconazole showed the greatest variation in minimum inhibitory concentration (0.03-2 microg/mL) and had different susceptibility patterns for the two species. CONCLUSIONS: Of the three antifungals tested, terbinafine had the most potent in vitro antifungal activity against dermatophytes. Antifungal susceptibility tests would be useful to screen antifungal-resistant dermatophyte strains. SN - 0307-6938 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17714532/In_vitro_antifungal_susceptibility_patterns_of_dermatophyte_strains_causing_tinea_unguium_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1111/j.1365-2230.2007.02480.x DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -