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Influenza- and respiratory syncytial virus-associated mortality and hospitalisations.
Eur Respir J. 2007 Dec; 30(6):1158-66.ER

Abstract

The aim of the current study was to estimate influenza- and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-associated mortality and hospitalisations, especially the influenza-associated burden among low-risk individuals < or =65 yrs old, not yet recommended for influenza vaccination in many European countries. Retrospectively during 1997-2003, Dutch national all-cause mortality and hospital discharge figures and virus surveillance data were used to estimate annual average influenza- and RSV-associated excess mortality and hospitalisation using rate difference methods. Influenza virus active periods were significantly associated with excess mortality among 50-64-yr-olds and the elderly, but not in younger age categories. Influenza-associated hospitalisation was highest and about equal for 0-1-yr-olds and the elderly, and also significant for low-risk adults. Hospitalisation among children was mostly due to respiratory conditions, and among adults cardiovascular complications were frequent. RSV-active periods were associated with excess mortality and hospitalisation among the elderly. The highest RSV-related excess hospitalisation was found in 0-1-yr-olds. Influenza-associated mortality was demonstrated in 50-64-yr-olds. Among low-risk individuals < or =65 yrs of age, influenza-associated hospitalisation rates were highest for 0-4-yr-olds, but also significant for 5-64-yr-olds. These data may further support extension of recommendations for influenza vaccination to include younger low-risk persons. The respiratory syncytial virus-associated burden was highest for young children but also substantial for the elderly.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Julius Center for Health Sciences and Primary Care, University Medical Center Utrecht, PO Box 85500, 3508 GA Utrecht, The Netherlands.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17715167

Citation

Jansen, A G S C., et al. "Influenza- and Respiratory Syncytial Virus-associated Mortality and Hospitalisations." The European Respiratory Journal, vol. 30, no. 6, 2007, pp. 1158-66.
Jansen AG, Sanders EA, Hoes AW, et al. Influenza- and respiratory syncytial virus-associated mortality and hospitalisations. Eur Respir J. 2007;30(6):1158-66.
Jansen, A. G., Sanders, E. A., Hoes, A. W., van Loon, A. M., & Hak, E. (2007). Influenza- and respiratory syncytial virus-associated mortality and hospitalisations. The European Respiratory Journal, 30(6), 1158-66.
Jansen AG, et al. Influenza- and Respiratory Syncytial Virus-associated Mortality and Hospitalisations. Eur Respir J. 2007;30(6):1158-66. PubMed PMID: 17715167.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Influenza- and respiratory syncytial virus-associated mortality and hospitalisations. AU - Jansen,A G S C, AU - Sanders,E A M, AU - Hoes,A W, AU - van Loon,A M, AU - Hak,E, Y1 - 2007/08/22/ PY - 2007/8/24/pubmed PY - 2008/2/28/medline PY - 2007/8/24/entrez SP - 1158 EP - 66 JF - The European respiratory journal JO - Eur Respir J VL - 30 IS - 6 N2 - The aim of the current study was to estimate influenza- and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV)-associated mortality and hospitalisations, especially the influenza-associated burden among low-risk individuals < or =65 yrs old, not yet recommended for influenza vaccination in many European countries. Retrospectively during 1997-2003, Dutch national all-cause mortality and hospital discharge figures and virus surveillance data were used to estimate annual average influenza- and RSV-associated excess mortality and hospitalisation using rate difference methods. Influenza virus active periods were significantly associated with excess mortality among 50-64-yr-olds and the elderly, but not in younger age categories. Influenza-associated hospitalisation was highest and about equal for 0-1-yr-olds and the elderly, and also significant for low-risk adults. Hospitalisation among children was mostly due to respiratory conditions, and among adults cardiovascular complications were frequent. RSV-active periods were associated with excess mortality and hospitalisation among the elderly. The highest RSV-related excess hospitalisation was found in 0-1-yr-olds. Influenza-associated mortality was demonstrated in 50-64-yr-olds. Among low-risk individuals < or =65 yrs of age, influenza-associated hospitalisation rates were highest for 0-4-yr-olds, but also significant for 5-64-yr-olds. These data may further support extension of recommendations for influenza vaccination to include younger low-risk persons. The respiratory syncytial virus-associated burden was highest for young children but also substantial for the elderly. SN - 0903-1936 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17715167/Influenza__and_respiratory_syncytial_virus_associated_mortality_and_hospitalisations_ L2 - http://erj.ersjournals.com/cgi/pmidlookup?view=long&amp;pmid=17715167 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -