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Potential of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for the rapid identification of Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes cultures on silver colloidal nanoparticles.
Appl Spectrosc. 2007 Aug; 61(8):824-31.AS

Abstract

Surface-enhanced Raman (SERS) spectra of various batches of bacteria adsorbed on silver colloidal nanoparticles were collected to explore the potential of the SERS technique for rapid and routine identification of E. coli and L. monocytogenes cultures. Relative standard deviation (RSD) of SERS spectra from silver colloidal suspensions and ratios of SERS peaks from small molecules (K(3)PO(4)) were used to evaluate the reproducibility, stability, and binding effectiveness of citrate-reduced silver colloids over batch and storage processes. The results suggested consistent reproducibility of silver colloids over batch process and also stability and consistent binding effectiveness over an eight-week storage period. A variety of mixtures of E. coli/L. monocytogenes cultures with different colloidal batches revealed that, despite large variations in relative intensities and positions of SERS active bands, characteristic and unique bands at 712 and 390 cm(-1) were consistently observed and were the strongest in E. coli and L. monocytogenes cultures, respectively. Two specific bands were used to develop simple algorithms in the evaluation of binding effectiveness of silver colloids over storage and further to identify E. coli and L. monocytogenes cultures with a 100% success. A single spectrum acquisition took 5 approximately 6 min, and a minimum of 25 microL silver colloid was directly mixed with 25 microL volume of incubated bacterial culture. The short acquisition time and small volume of incubated bacterial culture make silver colloidal nanoparticle based SERS spectroscopy ideal for potential use in the routine and rapid screening of E. coli and L. monocytogenes cultures on large scales. This is the first report of the development of simple and universal algorithms for bacterial identification from the respective exclusive SERS peaks.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Nutrition and Food Science, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742, USA.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17716400

Citation

Liu, Yongliang, et al. "Potential of Surface-enhanced Raman Spectroscopy for the Rapid Identification of Escherichia Coli and Listeria Monocytogenes Cultures On Silver Colloidal Nanoparticles." Applied Spectroscopy, vol. 61, no. 8, 2007, pp. 824-31.
Liu Y, Chen YR, Nou X, et al. Potential of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for the rapid identification of Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes cultures on silver colloidal nanoparticles. Appl Spectrosc. 2007;61(8):824-31.
Liu, Y., Chen, Y. R., Nou, X., & Chao, K. (2007). Potential of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for the rapid identification of Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes cultures on silver colloidal nanoparticles. Applied Spectroscopy, 61(8), 824-31.
Liu Y, et al. Potential of Surface-enhanced Raman Spectroscopy for the Rapid Identification of Escherichia Coli and Listeria Monocytogenes Cultures On Silver Colloidal Nanoparticles. Appl Spectrosc. 2007;61(8):824-31. PubMed PMID: 17716400.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Potential of surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy for the rapid identification of Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes cultures on silver colloidal nanoparticles. AU - Liu,Yongliang, AU - Chen,Yud-Ren, AU - Nou,Xiangwu, AU - Chao,Kuanglin, PY - 2007/8/25/pubmed PY - 2007/9/21/medline PY - 2007/8/25/entrez SP - 824 EP - 31 JF - Applied spectroscopy JO - Appl Spectrosc VL - 61 IS - 8 N2 - Surface-enhanced Raman (SERS) spectra of various batches of bacteria adsorbed on silver colloidal nanoparticles were collected to explore the potential of the SERS technique for rapid and routine identification of E. coli and L. monocytogenes cultures. Relative standard deviation (RSD) of SERS spectra from silver colloidal suspensions and ratios of SERS peaks from small molecules (K(3)PO(4)) were used to evaluate the reproducibility, stability, and binding effectiveness of citrate-reduced silver colloids over batch and storage processes. The results suggested consistent reproducibility of silver colloids over batch process and also stability and consistent binding effectiveness over an eight-week storage period. A variety of mixtures of E. coli/L. monocytogenes cultures with different colloidal batches revealed that, despite large variations in relative intensities and positions of SERS active bands, characteristic and unique bands at 712 and 390 cm(-1) were consistently observed and were the strongest in E. coli and L. monocytogenes cultures, respectively. Two specific bands were used to develop simple algorithms in the evaluation of binding effectiveness of silver colloids over storage and further to identify E. coli and L. monocytogenes cultures with a 100% success. A single spectrum acquisition took 5 approximately 6 min, and a minimum of 25 microL silver colloid was directly mixed with 25 microL volume of incubated bacterial culture. The short acquisition time and small volume of incubated bacterial culture make silver colloidal nanoparticle based SERS spectroscopy ideal for potential use in the routine and rapid screening of E. coli and L. monocytogenes cultures on large scales. This is the first report of the development of simple and universal algorithms for bacterial identification from the respective exclusive SERS peaks. SN - 0003-7028 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17716400/Potential_of_surface_enhanced_Raman_spectroscopy_for_the_rapid_identification_of_Escherichia_coli_and_Listeria_monocytogenes_cultures_on_silver_colloidal_nanoparticles_ L2 - https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/10.1366/000370207781540060?url_ver=Z39.88-2003&rfr_id=ori:rid:crossref.org&rfr_dat=cr_pub=pubmed DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -