Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Inflammatory markers in late-life depression: results from a population-based study.
J Affect Disord. 2008 Mar; 106(3):249-55.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Previous studies have reported conflicting results concerning the association between several inflammatory markers and depression. The association between inflammation and depression may depend on the presence of specific chronic diseases or be relevant in specific sub-groups of depressed patients only.

OBJECTIVE

To assess associations between inflammatory markers and depression in older people, taking account of confounding and effect-modifying factors.

METHOD

Population-based study of 1285 participants of the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam, aged 65 and over. Plasma concentrations of Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured. Major depression (first- or recurrent episode) and sub-threshold depression were assessed. Associations were adjusted for confounding variables. Associations with inflammatory markers were further studied with regard to severity and duration of depression, and with regard to specific depressive symptoms.

RESULTS

High levels of IL-6 (above 5 pg/mL) were associated with major depression (odds ratio 2.49 (1.07-5.80), both in recurrent and first episodes. No significant effect of either one of the markers on specific symptom dimensions of depression was found. Mildly elevated plasma levels of CRP (above 3.2 mg/L) were associated with higher CES-D scores, but not after correction for the confounding effect of age and chronic diseases.

LIMITATIONS

The cross-sectional design limits conclusions regarding causality.

CONCLUSIONS

A high plasma level of IL-6, but not CRP, is associated with an increased prevalence of major depression in older people, independent of age, chronic diseases, cognitive functioning and anti-depressants. Present results suggest new directions for clinical research into the prevention of physical consequences of depression.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Psychiatry, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. ma.bremmer@vumc.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17716746

Citation

Bremmer, M A., et al. "Inflammatory Markers in Late-life Depression: Results From a Population-based Study." Journal of Affective Disorders, vol. 106, no. 3, 2008, pp. 249-55.
Bremmer MA, Beekman AT, Deeg DJ, et al. Inflammatory markers in late-life depression: results from a population-based study. J Affect Disord. 2008;106(3):249-55.
Bremmer, M. A., Beekman, A. T., Deeg, D. J., Penninx, B. W., Dik, M. G., Hack, C. E., & Hoogendijk, W. J. (2008). Inflammatory markers in late-life depression: results from a population-based study. Journal of Affective Disorders, 106(3), 249-55.
Bremmer MA, et al. Inflammatory Markers in Late-life Depression: Results From a Population-based Study. J Affect Disord. 2008;106(3):249-55. PubMed PMID: 17716746.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Inflammatory markers in late-life depression: results from a population-based study. AU - Bremmer,M A, AU - Beekman,A T F, AU - Deeg,D J H, AU - Penninx,B W J H, AU - Dik,M G, AU - Hack,C E, AU - Hoogendijk,W J G, Y1 - 2007/08/22/ PY - 2007/04/10/received PY - 2007/07/03/revised PY - 2007/07/04/accepted PY - 2007/8/25/pubmed PY - 2008/4/18/medline PY - 2007/8/25/entrez SP - 249 EP - 55 JF - Journal of affective disorders JO - J Affect Disord VL - 106 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Previous studies have reported conflicting results concerning the association between several inflammatory markers and depression. The association between inflammation and depression may depend on the presence of specific chronic diseases or be relevant in specific sub-groups of depressed patients only. OBJECTIVE: To assess associations between inflammatory markers and depression in older people, taking account of confounding and effect-modifying factors. METHOD: Population-based study of 1285 participants of the Longitudinal Aging Study Amsterdam, aged 65 and over. Plasma concentrations of Interleukin-6 (IL-6) and C-reactive protein (CRP) were measured. Major depression (first- or recurrent episode) and sub-threshold depression were assessed. Associations were adjusted for confounding variables. Associations with inflammatory markers were further studied with regard to severity and duration of depression, and with regard to specific depressive symptoms. RESULTS: High levels of IL-6 (above 5 pg/mL) were associated with major depression (odds ratio 2.49 (1.07-5.80), both in recurrent and first episodes. No significant effect of either one of the markers on specific symptom dimensions of depression was found. Mildly elevated plasma levels of CRP (above 3.2 mg/L) were associated with higher CES-D scores, but not after correction for the confounding effect of age and chronic diseases. LIMITATIONS: The cross-sectional design limits conclusions regarding causality. CONCLUSIONS: A high plasma level of IL-6, but not CRP, is associated with an increased prevalence of major depression in older people, independent of age, chronic diseases, cognitive functioning and anti-depressants. Present results suggest new directions for clinical research into the prevention of physical consequences of depression. SN - 0165-0327 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17716746/Inflammatory_markers_in_late_life_depression:_results_from_a_population_based_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0165-0327(07)00254-6 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -