Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

Depression in old age (75+), the PIKO study.
J Affect Disord. 2008 Mar; 106(3):295-9.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Old people (75+) are underrepresented in studies on the prevalence of and risk factors for depression while the number of elderly people suffering from this mood disorder may be considerably higher than previously assumed. The role--if any--of age and gender in 'Geriatric Depression' is still unclear.

METHODS

In this community-based study, prevalence of depressive symptomatology and risk indicators were assessed in 2850 participants aged 75 years or more. A clinically relevant level of depressive symptoms was defined as a score of > or =16 on the Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale (CES-D). Demographic data and questions related to physical and psychological health were recorded. Simple and multiple logistic regression techniques were used to determine the risk indicators (Odds Ratios, OR, with 95% confidence intervals, CI) with apparent importance to this population.

RESULTS

The prevalence of depressive symptoms was assessed to be 31.1%. This is considerably higher than what has been found in younger elderly samples. The bivariate age effect was OR 1.05 (95% CI=1.03 to 1.07). Controlling for confounding, the effect of gender and age on depressive symptoms disappeared.

CONCLUSIONS

Depressive symptoms are highly prevalent in the elderly population and increase with age. This increase seems to be attributable to age-related changes in risk factors rather than to ageing itself. With regard to the risk factors found, attention should perhaps be paid to functional disability, loneliness and apprehensiveness for falling since these risk indicators are amenable for improvement.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of General Practice, VU University Medical Centre, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. pj.vantveer@vumc.nlNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Comparative Study
Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17720253

Citation

van't Veer-Tazelaar, Petronella J., et al. "Depression in Old Age (75+), the PIKO Study." Journal of Affective Disorders, vol. 106, no. 3, 2008, pp. 295-9.
van't Veer-Tazelaar PJ, van Marwijk HW, Jansen AP, et al. Depression in old age (75+), the PIKO study. J Affect Disord. 2008;106(3):295-9.
van't Veer-Tazelaar, P. J., van Marwijk, H. W., Jansen, A. P., Rijmen, F., Kostense, P. J., van Oppen, P., van Hout, H. P., Stalman, W. A., & Beekman, A. T. (2008). Depression in old age (75+), the PIKO study. Journal of Affective Disorders, 106(3), 295-9.
van't Veer-Tazelaar PJ, et al. Depression in Old Age (75+), the PIKO Study. J Affect Disord. 2008;106(3):295-9. PubMed PMID: 17720253.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Depression in old age (75+), the PIKO study. AU - van't Veer-Tazelaar,Petronella J, AU - van Marwijk,Harm W J, AU - Jansen,Aaltje P D, AU - Rijmen,Frank, AU - Kostense,Pieter J, AU - van Oppen,Patricia, AU - van Hout,Hein P J, AU - Stalman,Wim A B, AU - Beekman,Aartjan T F, Y1 - 2007/08/27/ PY - 2007/04/12/received PY - 2007/07/04/revised PY - 2007/07/05/accepted PY - 2007/8/28/pubmed PY - 2008/4/18/medline PY - 2007/8/28/entrez SP - 295 EP - 9 JF - Journal of affective disorders JO - J Affect Disord VL - 106 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: Old people (75+) are underrepresented in studies on the prevalence of and risk factors for depression while the number of elderly people suffering from this mood disorder may be considerably higher than previously assumed. The role--if any--of age and gender in 'Geriatric Depression' is still unclear. METHODS: In this community-based study, prevalence of depressive symptomatology and risk indicators were assessed in 2850 participants aged 75 years or more. A clinically relevant level of depressive symptoms was defined as a score of > or =16 on the Centre for Epidemiologic Studies Depression scale (CES-D). Demographic data and questions related to physical and psychological health were recorded. Simple and multiple logistic regression techniques were used to determine the risk indicators (Odds Ratios, OR, with 95% confidence intervals, CI) with apparent importance to this population. RESULTS: The prevalence of depressive symptoms was assessed to be 31.1%. This is considerably higher than what has been found in younger elderly samples. The bivariate age effect was OR 1.05 (95% CI=1.03 to 1.07). Controlling for confounding, the effect of gender and age on depressive symptoms disappeared. CONCLUSIONS: Depressive symptoms are highly prevalent in the elderly population and increase with age. This increase seems to be attributable to age-related changes in risk factors rather than to ageing itself. With regard to the risk factors found, attention should perhaps be paid to functional disability, loneliness and apprehensiveness for falling since these risk indicators are amenable for improvement. SN - 0165-0327 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17720253/Depression_in_old_age__75+__the_PIKO_study_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0165-0327(07)00256-X DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -