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Impact of a pertussis booster vaccination program in adolescents and adults on the epidemiology of pertussis in Austria.
Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2007 Sep; 26(9):806-10.PI

Abstract

BACKGROUND

A resurgence of pertussis has been observed in several countries; however, inconsistent data are available for Europe. In Austria, routine pertussis vaccination for babies is administered at 3, 4, and 5 months, and in the second year of life. Since 2002, regular boosters for all persons >6 years of age (including adults) are recommended. This study was undertaken to analyze epidemiologic trends of laboratory-reported pertussis to evaluate current vaccination strategy in Austria.

METHODS

Epidemiologic surveillance of laboratory-reported pertussis was conducted from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2005. Infection was confirmed by positive serology, by positive culture of Bordetella pertussis, or by detection of sequences of the pertussis toxin gene by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Data were assessed by age, hospitalization rate, seasonality, and incidence rate.

RESULTS

During the observation period 4395 reported cases of pertussis were eligible for analysis. The mean annual incidence increased from 6.4 per 100,000 population in 2000 to 11.1 cases per 100,000 population in 2005. Incidence rates were highest among children less than 1 year of age. Decreasing rates were observed for children and adolescents <16 years of age, whereas increasing rates were detected for persons 16 years of age and older. The mean age of reported pertussis cases increased from 30 years (+/-25.9 SD) in 2000 to approximately 44 years (+/-23.7 SD) in 2005. Hospitalization rates were highest in infants <6 months (86%) and lowest in those 10 to <50 years of age (17%), followed by an increase to 80% in persons 85 years of age and older. In general, no seasonal occurrence of disease was apparent.

CONCLUSIONS

Pertussis incidence remains high among adults implying that coverage rates regarding booster vaccinations for adolescents and adults still are too low. Reinforced application of the current booster strategy is needed.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Specific Prophylaxis and Tropical Medicine, Medical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria. pamela.rendi-wagner@meduniwien.ac.atNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17721375

Citation

Rendi-Wagner, Pamela, et al. "Impact of a Pertussis Booster Vaccination Program in Adolescents and Adults On the Epidemiology of Pertussis in Austria." The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, vol. 26, no. 9, 2007, pp. 806-10.
Rendi-Wagner P, Paulke-Korinek M, Stanek G, et al. Impact of a pertussis booster vaccination program in adolescents and adults on the epidemiology of pertussis in Austria. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2007;26(9):806-10.
Rendi-Wagner, P., Paulke-Korinek, M., Stanek, G., Khanakah, G., & Kollaritsch, H. (2007). Impact of a pertussis booster vaccination program in adolescents and adults on the epidemiology of pertussis in Austria. The Pediatric Infectious Disease Journal, 26(9), 806-10.
Rendi-Wagner P, et al. Impact of a Pertussis Booster Vaccination Program in Adolescents and Adults On the Epidemiology of Pertussis in Austria. Pediatr Infect Dis J. 2007;26(9):806-10. PubMed PMID: 17721375.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Impact of a pertussis booster vaccination program in adolescents and adults on the epidemiology of pertussis in Austria. AU - Rendi-Wagner,Pamela, AU - Paulke-Korinek,Maria, AU - Stanek,Gerold, AU - Khanakah,Gelas, AU - Kollaritsch,Herwig, PY - 2007/8/28/pubmed PY - 2008/2/22/medline PY - 2007/8/28/entrez SP - 806 EP - 10 JF - The Pediatric infectious disease journal JO - Pediatr Infect Dis J VL - 26 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: A resurgence of pertussis has been observed in several countries; however, inconsistent data are available for Europe. In Austria, routine pertussis vaccination for babies is administered at 3, 4, and 5 months, and in the second year of life. Since 2002, regular boosters for all persons >6 years of age (including adults) are recommended. This study was undertaken to analyze epidemiologic trends of laboratory-reported pertussis to evaluate current vaccination strategy in Austria. METHODS: Epidemiologic surveillance of laboratory-reported pertussis was conducted from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2005. Infection was confirmed by positive serology, by positive culture of Bordetella pertussis, or by detection of sequences of the pertussis toxin gene by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Data were assessed by age, hospitalization rate, seasonality, and incidence rate. RESULTS: During the observation period 4395 reported cases of pertussis were eligible for analysis. The mean annual incidence increased from 6.4 per 100,000 population in 2000 to 11.1 cases per 100,000 population in 2005. Incidence rates were highest among children less than 1 year of age. Decreasing rates were observed for children and adolescents <16 years of age, whereas increasing rates were detected for persons 16 years of age and older. The mean age of reported pertussis cases increased from 30 years (+/-25.9 SD) in 2000 to approximately 44 years (+/-23.7 SD) in 2005. Hospitalization rates were highest in infants <6 months (86%) and lowest in those 10 to <50 years of age (17%), followed by an increase to 80% in persons 85 years of age and older. In general, no seasonal occurrence of disease was apparent. CONCLUSIONS: Pertussis incidence remains high among adults implying that coverage rates regarding booster vaccinations for adolescents and adults still are too low. Reinforced application of the current booster strategy is needed. SN - 0891-3668 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17721375/Impact_of_a_pertussis_booster_vaccination_program_in_adolescents_and_adults_on_the_epidemiology_of_pertussis_in_Austria_ L2 - https://doi.org/10.1097/INF.0b013e318124a9dd DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -