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Overall glycemic index and glycemic load of vegan diets in relation to plasma lipoproteins and triacylglycerols.
Ann Nutr Metab. 2007; 51(4):335-44.AN

Abstract

BACKGROUND

To investigate the overall glycemic index (GI), glycemic load (GL), and intake of dietary fiber, and to examine the associations between these factors and plasma lipoproteins and triacylglycerols in adult vegans in the German Vegan Study (GVS).

METHODS

Cross-sectional study, Germany. Healthy men (n = 67) and women (n = 87), who fulfilled the study criteria (vegan diet for >or=1 year prior to study start; minimum age of 18 years; no pregnancy/childbirth during the last 12 months) and who participated in all study segments.

RESULTS

The average dietary GL of the GVS population was 144, and the average GI was 51.4. The adjusted geometric mean total, HDL, and LDL cholesterol concentrations decreased across the increasing quartiles of GL, carbohydrate and dietary fiber intake. The associations between total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and GL density and GI were inconsistent. Also, associations between GI, GL, the intake of carbohydrates, and triacylglycerol concentration were not observed.

CONCLUSIONS

Fiber-rich vegan diets are characterized by a low GI and a low to moderate GL. The data do not support the hypothesis that a carbohydrate-rich diet per se is associated with unfavorable effects on triaclyglycerols that would be predicted to increase the risk of coronary heart disease.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Nutrition Physiology and Human Nutrition Unit, Institute of Food Science, Centre for Applied Chemistry, University of Hannover, Hannover, Germany.No affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17726311

Citation

Waldmann, Annika, et al. "Overall Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load of Vegan Diets in Relation to Plasma Lipoproteins and Triacylglycerols." Annals of Nutrition & Metabolism, vol. 51, no. 4, 2007, pp. 335-44.
Waldmann A, Ströhle A, Koschizke JW, et al. Overall glycemic index and glycemic load of vegan diets in relation to plasma lipoproteins and triacylglycerols. Ann Nutr Metab. 2007;51(4):335-44.
Waldmann, A., Ströhle, A., Koschizke, J. W., Leitzmann, C., & Hahn, A. (2007). Overall glycemic index and glycemic load of vegan diets in relation to plasma lipoproteins and triacylglycerols. Annals of Nutrition & Metabolism, 51(4), 335-44.
Waldmann A, et al. Overall Glycemic Index and Glycemic Load of Vegan Diets in Relation to Plasma Lipoproteins and Triacylglycerols. Ann Nutr Metab. 2007;51(4):335-44. PubMed PMID: 17726311.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Overall glycemic index and glycemic load of vegan diets in relation to plasma lipoproteins and triacylglycerols. AU - Waldmann,Annika, AU - Ströhle,Alexander, AU - Koschizke,Jochen W, AU - Leitzmann,Claus, AU - Hahn,Andreas, Y1 - 2007/08/28/ PY - 2006/03/24/received PY - 2006/12/27/accepted PY - 2007/8/30/pubmed PY - 2007/10/13/medline PY - 2007/8/30/entrez SP - 335 EP - 44 JF - Annals of nutrition & metabolism JO - Ann Nutr Metab VL - 51 IS - 4 N2 - BACKGROUND: To investigate the overall glycemic index (GI), glycemic load (GL), and intake of dietary fiber, and to examine the associations between these factors and plasma lipoproteins and triacylglycerols in adult vegans in the German Vegan Study (GVS). METHODS: Cross-sectional study, Germany. Healthy men (n = 67) and women (n = 87), who fulfilled the study criteria (vegan diet for >or=1 year prior to study start; minimum age of 18 years; no pregnancy/childbirth during the last 12 months) and who participated in all study segments. RESULTS: The average dietary GL of the GVS population was 144, and the average GI was 51.4. The adjusted geometric mean total, HDL, and LDL cholesterol concentrations decreased across the increasing quartiles of GL, carbohydrate and dietary fiber intake. The associations between total cholesterol, HDL cholesterol, LDL cholesterol and GL density and GI were inconsistent. Also, associations between GI, GL, the intake of carbohydrates, and triacylglycerol concentration were not observed. CONCLUSIONS: Fiber-rich vegan diets are characterized by a low GI and a low to moderate GL. The data do not support the hypothesis that a carbohydrate-rich diet per se is associated with unfavorable effects on triaclyglycerols that would be predicted to increase the risk of coronary heart disease. SN - 1421-9697 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17726311/Overall_glycemic_index_and_glycemic_load_of_vegan_diets_in_relation_to_plasma_lipoproteins_and_triacylglycerols_ L2 - https://www.karger.com?DOI=10.1159/000107676 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -