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Early congenital syphilis: experience with 13 consecutive cases seen at the University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur.
Singapore Med J. 1991 Aug; 32(4):230-2.SM

Abstract

While it is not difficult to recognise the classical clinical features of congenital syphilis in most cases, some of them may present with unusual manifestations which can defy early diagnosis. We report our experience with 13 cases of early congenital syphilis over a period of 10 years from 1980 to 1989. Twelve of the thirteen patients were less than 3 months at presentation. There were two infants born prematurely and six of the babies were born with a low birthweight (less than 2.5 kg). All but four patients survived following treatment. Skin lesions either in the form of typical vesiculobullous eruption over the palms and soles or a maculopapular skin rash over the body were the most common presentation and was seen in 10 patients. Splenomegaly with or without hepatomegaly was the most consistent physical sign. Radiological changes in the form of periostitis and/or metaphysitis were seen in all cases where an X-ray of the long bones was performed. An elevated serum immunoglobulin M, though non-specific for the disease, was found to be a useful screening test for recent infection.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Paediatrics, Faculty of Medicine, University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur.No affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

1775999

Citation

Koh, M T., and C T. Lim. "Early Congenital Syphilis: Experience With 13 Consecutive Cases Seen at the University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur." Singapore Medical Journal, vol. 32, no. 4, 1991, pp. 230-2.
Koh MT, Lim CT. Early congenital syphilis: experience with 13 consecutive cases seen at the University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur. Singapore Med J. 1991;32(4):230-2.
Koh, M. T., & Lim, C. T. (1991). Early congenital syphilis: experience with 13 consecutive cases seen at the University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur. Singapore Medical Journal, 32(4), 230-2.
Koh MT, Lim CT. Early Congenital Syphilis: Experience With 13 Consecutive Cases Seen at the University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur. Singapore Med J. 1991;32(4):230-2. PubMed PMID: 1775999.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Early congenital syphilis: experience with 13 consecutive cases seen at the University Hospital, Kuala Lumpur. AU - Koh,M T, AU - Lim,C T, PY - 1991/8/1/pubmed PY - 1991/8/1/medline PY - 1991/8/1/entrez SP - 230 EP - 2 JF - Singapore medical journal JO - Singapore Med J VL - 32 IS - 4 N2 - While it is not difficult to recognise the classical clinical features of congenital syphilis in most cases, some of them may present with unusual manifestations which can defy early diagnosis. We report our experience with 13 cases of early congenital syphilis over a period of 10 years from 1980 to 1989. Twelve of the thirteen patients were less than 3 months at presentation. There were two infants born prematurely and six of the babies were born with a low birthweight (less than 2.5 kg). All but four patients survived following treatment. Skin lesions either in the form of typical vesiculobullous eruption over the palms and soles or a maculopapular skin rash over the body were the most common presentation and was seen in 10 patients. Splenomegaly with or without hepatomegaly was the most consistent physical sign. Radiological changes in the form of periostitis and/or metaphysitis were seen in all cases where an X-ray of the long bones was performed. An elevated serum immunoglobulin M, though non-specific for the disease, was found to be a useful screening test for recent infection. SN - 0037-5675 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/1775999/Early_congenital_syphilis:_experience_with_13_consecutive_cases_seen_at_the_University_Hospital,_Kuala_Lumpur DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -
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