Tags

Type your tag names separated by a space and hit enter

The influence of sociodemographic factors on patterns of fruit and vegetable consumption in Canadian adolescents.
J Am Diet Assoc. 2007 Sep; 107(9):1511-8.JA

Abstract

BACKGROUND

Poor dietary habits may increase risk for obesity and chronic diseases among Canadian adolescents.

OBJECTIVES

The aims of the present study were to: (a) establish the patterns of fruit and vegetable intake by Canadian adolescents, and (b) identify the impact of sociodemographic factors-including age, household income, household education, ethnicity, living arrangement, and location-on the pattern of fruit and vegetable intake in this population.

DESIGN

This is a cross-sectional study using the data from the Canadian Community Health Survey, Cycle 2.1, Public Use File. The survey used questions similar to a food frequency questionnaire.

METHODS

Total fruit and vegetable intake of 18,524 Canadian adolescents (12 to 19 years old) was cross-tabulated between two age groups (12 to 14 years old [n=7,410] and 15 to 19 years old [n=11,114]) by sex, level of household education, total household income, ethnicity, living arrangement, and geographical location.

RESULTS

The data revealed that a 38.3% of Canadian adolescents in this study consumed fruits and vegetables five to 10 times per day; fewer older adolescents (15- to 19-year-olds) reported eating fruits and vegetables at that frequency as compared with the younger subgroup (12- to 14-year-olds) (P<0.001). Household education and income independently had a significant (P<0.001) positive impact on fruit and vegetable consumption. Females reported a significantly (P<0.05) higher frequency of intake than did males. Adolescents living in homes with only one parent reported a significantly (P<0.005) lower frequency of intake, as compared with adolescents living with two parents.

CONCLUSIONS

These results may help to identify adolescent groups at risk for poor eating habits and support the implementation of programs to encourage higher fruit and vegetable intakes.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Human Nutritional Sciences, University of Manitoba, Canada. nriediger@sbrc.caNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17761228

Citation

Riediger, Natalie Diane, et al. "The Influence of Sociodemographic Factors On Patterns of Fruit and Vegetable Consumption in Canadian Adolescents." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 107, no. 9, 2007, pp. 1511-8.
Riediger ND, Shooshtari S, Moghadasian MH. The influence of sociodemographic factors on patterns of fruit and vegetable consumption in Canadian adolescents. J Am Diet Assoc. 2007;107(9):1511-8.
Riediger, N. D., Shooshtari, S., & Moghadasian, M. H. (2007). The influence of sociodemographic factors on patterns of fruit and vegetable consumption in Canadian adolescents. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 107(9), 1511-8.
Riediger ND, Shooshtari S, Moghadasian MH. The Influence of Sociodemographic Factors On Patterns of Fruit and Vegetable Consumption in Canadian Adolescents. J Am Diet Assoc. 2007;107(9):1511-8. PubMed PMID: 17761228.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - The influence of sociodemographic factors on patterns of fruit and vegetable consumption in Canadian adolescents. AU - Riediger,Natalie Diane, AU - Shooshtari,Shahin, AU - Moghadasian,Mohammed Hassan, PY - 2006/08/25/received PY - 2007/9/1/pubmed PY - 2007/11/6/medline PY - 2007/9/1/entrez SP - 1511 EP - 8 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 107 IS - 9 N2 - BACKGROUND: Poor dietary habits may increase risk for obesity and chronic diseases among Canadian adolescents. OBJECTIVES: The aims of the present study were to: (a) establish the patterns of fruit and vegetable intake by Canadian adolescents, and (b) identify the impact of sociodemographic factors-including age, household income, household education, ethnicity, living arrangement, and location-on the pattern of fruit and vegetable intake in this population. DESIGN: This is a cross-sectional study using the data from the Canadian Community Health Survey, Cycle 2.1, Public Use File. The survey used questions similar to a food frequency questionnaire. METHODS: Total fruit and vegetable intake of 18,524 Canadian adolescents (12 to 19 years old) was cross-tabulated between two age groups (12 to 14 years old [n=7,410] and 15 to 19 years old [n=11,114]) by sex, level of household education, total household income, ethnicity, living arrangement, and geographical location. RESULTS: The data revealed that a 38.3% of Canadian adolescents in this study consumed fruits and vegetables five to 10 times per day; fewer older adolescents (15- to 19-year-olds) reported eating fruits and vegetables at that frequency as compared with the younger subgroup (12- to 14-year-olds) (P<0.001). Household education and income independently had a significant (P<0.001) positive impact on fruit and vegetable consumption. Females reported a significantly (P<0.05) higher frequency of intake than did males. Adolescents living in homes with only one parent reported a significantly (P<0.005) lower frequency of intake, as compared with adolescents living with two parents. CONCLUSIONS: These results may help to identify adolescent groups at risk for poor eating habits and support the implementation of programs to encourage higher fruit and vegetable intakes. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17761228/The_influence_of_sociodemographic_factors_on_patterns_of_fruit_and_vegetable_consumption_in_Canadian_adolescents_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8223(07)01295-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -