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Serum carotenoid levels vary by marital status.
J Am Diet Assoc 2007; 107(9):1581-5JA

Abstract

This study examined differences in serum carotenoid levels by marital status. The design was a cross-sectional, nationally representative survey of 16,597 participants ages 18 years and older from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The main outcome measures were serum levels of alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, lutein/zeaxanthin, lycopene, and total carotenoids. Multivariate linear regression was used to model the association of serum carotenoids and marital status by sex and age with adjustments made for age, race/ethnicity, years of education, household income, body mass index, alcohol use, physical activity, serum cotinine, serum cholesterol, and vitamin/mineral supplement use. Among men, never married marital status was associated with lower total carotenoid levels (mean 66.16 microg/dL, P=0.05), lutein/zeaxanthin (mean 15.57 microg/dL [0.27 micromol/L], P=0.01), and lycopene (mean 24.28 microg/dL [0.45 micromol/L], P=0.00) compared to married marital status among men. Divorced marital status was associated with lower lycopene levels (mean 24.23 microg/dL [0.45 micromol/L], P=0.00) compared to married men. Compared to married men, widowed marital status was associated with lower alpha-carotene (mean 2.47 microg/dL [0.05 micromol/L], P=0.02), beta-carotene (mean 11.52 microg/dL [0.21 micromol/L], P=0.04), and lycopene levels (mean 25.15 microg/dL [0.47 micromol/L], P=0.04). Among women, widowed marital status was associated with lower levels of total carotenoids (mean 62.72 microg/dL, P=0.01), alpha-carotene (mean 1.85 microg/dL [0.03 micromol/L], P=0.01), beta-carotene (mean 11.57 microg/dL [0.22 micromol/L], P=0.03), and lutein/zeaxanthin (mean 17.50 microg/dL [0.31 micromol/L], P=0.05) compared to married women. Our conclusion is that serum carotenoid levels varied by marital status, and widowed men and women were at the greatest risk of low carotenoid levels.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Social and Behavioral Sciences, University of North Texas Health Science Center, 3500 Camp Bowie Blvd, Fort Worth, TX 76107-2699, USA. jstimpso@hsc.unt.eduNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17761235

Citation

Stimpson, Jim P., and Nuha A. Lackan. "Serum Carotenoid Levels Vary By Marital Status." Journal of the American Dietetic Association, vol. 107, no. 9, 2007, pp. 1581-5.
Stimpson JP, Lackan NA. Serum carotenoid levels vary by marital status. J Am Diet Assoc. 2007;107(9):1581-5.
Stimpson, J. P., & Lackan, N. A. (2007). Serum carotenoid levels vary by marital status. Journal of the American Dietetic Association, 107(9), pp. 1581-5.
Stimpson JP, Lackan NA. Serum Carotenoid Levels Vary By Marital Status. J Am Diet Assoc. 2007;107(9):1581-5. PubMed PMID: 17761235.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Serum carotenoid levels vary by marital status. AU - Stimpson,Jim P, AU - Lackan,Nuha A, PY - 2006/11/03/received PY - 2007/9/1/pubmed PY - 2007/11/6/medline PY - 2007/9/1/entrez SP - 1581 EP - 5 JF - Journal of the American Dietetic Association JO - J Am Diet Assoc VL - 107 IS - 9 N2 - This study examined differences in serum carotenoid levels by marital status. The design was a cross-sectional, nationally representative survey of 16,597 participants ages 18 years and older from the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. The main outcome measures were serum levels of alpha-carotene, beta-carotene, beta-cryptoxanthin, lutein/zeaxanthin, lycopene, and total carotenoids. Multivariate linear regression was used to model the association of serum carotenoids and marital status by sex and age with adjustments made for age, race/ethnicity, years of education, household income, body mass index, alcohol use, physical activity, serum cotinine, serum cholesterol, and vitamin/mineral supplement use. Among men, never married marital status was associated with lower total carotenoid levels (mean 66.16 microg/dL, P=0.05), lutein/zeaxanthin (mean 15.57 microg/dL [0.27 micromol/L], P=0.01), and lycopene (mean 24.28 microg/dL [0.45 micromol/L], P=0.00) compared to married marital status among men. Divorced marital status was associated with lower lycopene levels (mean 24.23 microg/dL [0.45 micromol/L], P=0.00) compared to married men. Compared to married men, widowed marital status was associated with lower alpha-carotene (mean 2.47 microg/dL [0.05 micromol/L], P=0.02), beta-carotene (mean 11.52 microg/dL [0.21 micromol/L], P=0.04), and lycopene levels (mean 25.15 microg/dL [0.47 micromol/L], P=0.04). Among women, widowed marital status was associated with lower levels of total carotenoids (mean 62.72 microg/dL, P=0.01), alpha-carotene (mean 1.85 microg/dL [0.03 micromol/L], P=0.01), beta-carotene (mean 11.57 microg/dL [0.22 micromol/L], P=0.03), and lutein/zeaxanthin (mean 17.50 microg/dL [0.31 micromol/L], P=0.05) compared to married women. Our conclusion is that serum carotenoid levels varied by marital status, and widowed men and women were at the greatest risk of low carotenoid levels. SN - 0002-8223 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17761235/Serum_carotenoid_levels_vary_by_marital_status_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0002-8223(07)01287-4 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -