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Caregiver burden among Japanese informal caregivers of cognitively impaired elderly in community settings.
Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2008 May-Jun; 46(3):367-74.AG

Abstract

Because dementia is a progressive disease, formal long-term care providers and care managers need information on how the severity of cognitive impairment affects caregiver burden in order to better assist family caregivers. However, research to guide care providers in behavioral symptom-management is not well developed. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between dementia status and burden of family caregivers. The subjects were 1875 community-dwelling elderly eligible for public long-term care insurance. The data we used in this analysis included the caregivers' and dependents' characteristics. The main outcome was subjective caregiver burden assessed by the Japanese version of the Zarit Burden Interview (J-ZBI). A total of 1559 pairs of dependents and caregivers were included in the analysis. The pairs were sorted into three mutually exclusive categories: no dementia, mild dementia, and severe dementia. Two hundred sixty-one dependents had severe dementia, and 725 had mild dementia. Although differences were found among the dementia categories in levels of caregiver burden according to the J-ZBI before and after adjusting for these baseline variables, the odds ratios equal nearly 1. The present study shows that severity of dementia is not associated with caregiver burden in Japan.

Authors+Show Affiliations

Department of Geriatrics, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, 65 Tsuruma-cho, Showa-ku, Nagoya, Aichi 466-8550, Japan. y.hirakawa@k8.dion.ne.jpNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info availableNo affiliation info available

Pub Type(s)

Journal Article

Language

eng

PubMed ID

17767968

Citation

Hirakawa, Yoshihisa, et al. "Caregiver Burden Among Japanese Informal Caregivers of Cognitively Impaired Elderly in Community Settings." Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, vol. 46, no. 3, 2008, pp. 367-74.
Hirakawa Y, Kuzuya M, Enoki H, et al. Caregiver burden among Japanese informal caregivers of cognitively impaired elderly in community settings. Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2008;46(3):367-74.
Hirakawa, Y., Kuzuya, M., Enoki, H., Hasegawa, J., & Iguch, A. (2008). Caregiver burden among Japanese informal caregivers of cognitively impaired elderly in community settings. Archives of Gerontology and Geriatrics, 46(3), 367-74.
Hirakawa Y, et al. Caregiver Burden Among Japanese Informal Caregivers of Cognitively Impaired Elderly in Community Settings. Arch Gerontol Geriatr. 2008 May-Jun;46(3):367-74. PubMed PMID: 17767968.
* Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
TY - JOUR T1 - Caregiver burden among Japanese informal caregivers of cognitively impaired elderly in community settings. AU - Hirakawa,Yoshihisa, AU - Kuzuya,Masafumi, AU - Enoki,Hiromi, AU - Hasegawa,Jun, AU - Iguch,Akihisa, Y1 - 2007/09/04/ PY - 2006/12/19/received PY - 2007/05/13/revised PY - 2007/05/16/accepted PY - 2007/9/5/pubmed PY - 2008/9/5/medline PY - 2007/9/5/entrez SP - 367 EP - 74 JF - Archives of gerontology and geriatrics JO - Arch Gerontol Geriatr VL - 46 IS - 3 N2 - Because dementia is a progressive disease, formal long-term care providers and care managers need information on how the severity of cognitive impairment affects caregiver burden in order to better assist family caregivers. However, research to guide care providers in behavioral symptom-management is not well developed. The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship between dementia status and burden of family caregivers. The subjects were 1875 community-dwelling elderly eligible for public long-term care insurance. The data we used in this analysis included the caregivers' and dependents' characteristics. The main outcome was subjective caregiver burden assessed by the Japanese version of the Zarit Burden Interview (J-ZBI). A total of 1559 pairs of dependents and caregivers were included in the analysis. The pairs were sorted into three mutually exclusive categories: no dementia, mild dementia, and severe dementia. Two hundred sixty-one dependents had severe dementia, and 725 had mild dementia. Although differences were found among the dementia categories in levels of caregiver burden according to the J-ZBI before and after adjusting for these baseline variables, the odds ratios equal nearly 1. The present study shows that severity of dementia is not associated with caregiver burden in Japan. SN - 0167-4943 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17767968/Caregiver_burden_among_Japanese_informal_caregivers_of_cognitively_impaired_elderly_in_community_settings_ L2 - https://linkinghub.elsevier.com/retrieve/pii/S0167-4943(07)00134-3 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -