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Lead burden and psychiatric symptoms and the modifying influence of the delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) polymorphism: the VA Normative Aging Study.

Abstract

The authors evaluated the association between lead burden and psychiatric symptoms and its potential modification by a delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) polymorphism. Lead measurements in blood or bone and self-reported ratings on the Brief Symptom Inventory from 1991 to 2002 were available for 1,075 US men participating in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Normative Aging Study. The authors estimated the prevalence odds ratio for the association between interquartile-range lead and abnormal symptom score, adjusting for potential confounders. An interquartile increment in tibia lead (14 microg/g) was associated with 21% higher odds of somatization (95% confidence interval of the odds ratio: 1.01, 1.46). An interquartile increment in patella lead (20 microg/g) corresponded to a 23% increase in the odds of global distress (95% confidence interval of the odds ratio: 1.02, 1.47). An interquartile increment in blood lead (2.8 microg/dl) was associated with 14% higher odds of hostility (95% confidence interval of the odds ratio: 1.02, 1.27). In all other analyses, lead was nonsignificantly associated with psychiatric symptoms. The adverse association of lead with abnormal mood scores was generally stronger among ALAD 1-1 carriers than 1-2/2-2 carriers, particularly regarding phobic anxiety symptoms (p(interaction) = 0.004). These results augment evidence of a deleterious association between lead and psychiatric symptoms.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, Boston, MA, USA. prajan@health.nyc.gov

    , , , , , , , , ,

    Source

    American journal of epidemiology 166:12 2007 Dec 15 pg 1400-8

    MeSH

    Adult
    Aged
    Aged, 80 and over
    Cohort Studies
    Environmental Exposure
    Genetic Predisposition to Disease
    Genotype
    Humans
    Lead
    Lead Poisoning, Nervous System, Adult
    Longitudinal Studies
    Male
    Massachusetts
    Mental Disorders
    Mental Status Schedule
    Middle Aged
    Patella
    Polymorphism, Genetic
    Porphobilinogen Synthase
    Regression Analysis
    Surveys and Questionnaires
    Tibia

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
    Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    17823382

    Citation

    Rajan, Pradeep, et al. "Lead Burden and Psychiatric Symptoms and the Modifying Influence of the Delta-aminolevulinic Acid Dehydratase (ALAD) Polymorphism: the VA Normative Aging Study." American Journal of Epidemiology, vol. 166, no. 12, 2007, pp. 1400-8.
    Rajan P, Kelsey KT, Schwartz JD, et al. Lead burden and psychiatric symptoms and the modifying influence of the delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) polymorphism: the VA Normative Aging Study. Am J Epidemiol. 2007;166(12):1400-8.
    Rajan, P., Kelsey, K. T., Schwartz, J. D., Bellinger, D. C., Weuve, J., Sparrow, D., ... Wright, R. O. (2007). Lead burden and psychiatric symptoms and the modifying influence of the delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) polymorphism: the VA Normative Aging Study. American Journal of Epidemiology, 166(12), pp. 1400-8.
    Rajan P, et al. Lead Burden and Psychiatric Symptoms and the Modifying Influence of the Delta-aminolevulinic Acid Dehydratase (ALAD) Polymorphism: the VA Normative Aging Study. Am J Epidemiol. 2007 Dec 15;166(12):1400-8. PubMed PMID: 17823382.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Lead burden and psychiatric symptoms and the modifying influence of the delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) polymorphism: the VA Normative Aging Study. AU - Rajan,Pradeep, AU - Kelsey,Karl T, AU - Schwartz,Joel D, AU - Bellinger,David C, AU - Weuve,Jennifer, AU - Sparrow,David, AU - Spiro,Avron,3rd AU - Smith,Thomas J, AU - Nie,Huiling, AU - Hu,Howard, AU - Wright,Robert O, Y1 - 2007/09/06/ PY - 2007/9/8/pubmed PY - 2008/1/25/medline PY - 2007/9/8/entrez SP - 1400 EP - 8 JF - American journal of epidemiology JO - Am. J. Epidemiol. VL - 166 IS - 12 N2 - The authors evaluated the association between lead burden and psychiatric symptoms and its potential modification by a delta-aminolevulinic acid dehydratase (ALAD) polymorphism. Lead measurements in blood or bone and self-reported ratings on the Brief Symptom Inventory from 1991 to 2002 were available for 1,075 US men participating in the Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Normative Aging Study. The authors estimated the prevalence odds ratio for the association between interquartile-range lead and abnormal symptom score, adjusting for potential confounders. An interquartile increment in tibia lead (14 microg/g) was associated with 21% higher odds of somatization (95% confidence interval of the odds ratio: 1.01, 1.46). An interquartile increment in patella lead (20 microg/g) corresponded to a 23% increase in the odds of global distress (95% confidence interval of the odds ratio: 1.02, 1.47). An interquartile increment in blood lead (2.8 microg/dl) was associated with 14% higher odds of hostility (95% confidence interval of the odds ratio: 1.02, 1.27). In all other analyses, lead was nonsignificantly associated with psychiatric symptoms. The adverse association of lead with abnormal mood scores was generally stronger among ALAD 1-1 carriers than 1-2/2-2 carriers, particularly regarding phobic anxiety symptoms (p(interaction) = 0.004). These results augment evidence of a deleterious association between lead and psychiatric symptoms. SN - 1476-6256 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17823382/Lead_burden_and_psychiatric_symptoms_and_the_modifying_influence_of_the_delta_aminolevulinic_acid_dehydratase__ALAD__polymorphism:_the_VA_Normative_Aging_Study_ L2 - https://academic.oup.com/aje/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/aje/kwm220 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -