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Effects of a vegetarian diet and treatment preference on biochemical and dietary variables in overweight and obese adults: a randomized clinical trial.

Abstract

BACKGROUND

A vegetarian diet may lead to numerous health benefits, including weight loss.

OBJECTIVE

We examined the joint effects of personal preference of dietary treatment and a calorie-restricted, low-fat lactoovovegetarian diet (LOV-D) compared with a standard calorie-restricted, low-fat omnivorous diet (STD-D) on changes in weight, total cholesterol, ratio of LDL to HDL cholesterol (LDL:HDL cholesterol), triacylglycerols, insulin resistance, and macronutrient intake during an 18-mo study.

DESIGN

This was a randomized clinical trial of 176 overweight and obese adults who were recruited and randomly assigned first to 1 of 2 preference conditions (yes or no). If assigned to Preference-No, they were randomly assigned to 1 of the 2 diet conditions (STD-D or LOV-D). If assigned to Preference-Yes, they were assigned to the diet they indicated as preferred at screening. The 12-mo intervention was followed by a 6-mo maintenance phase.

RESULTS

Participants were mainly women (86.9%) and white (70.5%); 75% completed the 18-mo study. A significant interaction between preference and dietary treatment was not observed for any of the outcome variables. However, participants in the Preference-No groups significantly decreased their triacylglycerols (P = 0.04). The only effect observed for diet was a borderline significant decrease in LDL:HDL cholesterol for the LOV-D group (P = 0.06). Within the LOV-D groups, those who were 100% adherent to the LOV-D had significant and marginally significant reductions in monounsaturated fat (P = 0.02) and total fat (P = 0.05) intakes at 18 mo.

CONCLUSIONS

Our findings suggest that neither prescribing a vegetarian diet nor allowing persons to choose their preferred diet had a significant effect on outcome measures. However, all participants had a significant reduction in total energy and fat intakes and an increase in energy expenditure, which was reflected in reduced body weight. This clinical trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00330629.

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  • Authors+Show Affiliations

    ,

    University of Pittsburgh School of Nursing, Pittsburgh, PA 15261, USA. lbu100@pitt.edu

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    Source

    MeSH

    Adult
    Blood Chemical Analysis
    Body Mass Index
    Cholesterol
    Cholesterol, HDL
    Cholesterol, LDL
    Diet, Fat-Restricted
    Diet, Reducing
    Diet, Vegetarian
    Exercise
    Female
    Follow-Up Studies
    Food Preferences
    Humans
    Insulin Resistance
    Male
    Middle Aged
    Obesity
    Overweight
    Patient Compliance
    Time Factors
    Treatment Outcome
    Triglycerides

    Pub Type(s)

    Journal Article
    Randomized Controlled Trial
    Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural

    Language

    eng

    PubMed ID

    17823421

    Citation

    Burke, Lora E., et al. "Effects of a Vegetarian Diet and Treatment Preference On Biochemical and Dietary Variables in Overweight and Obese Adults: a Randomized Clinical Trial." The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, vol. 86, no. 3, 2007, pp. 588-96.
    Burke LE, Hudson AG, Warziski MT, et al. Effects of a vegetarian diet and treatment preference on biochemical and dietary variables in overweight and obese adults: a randomized clinical trial. Am J Clin Nutr. 2007;86(3):588-96.
    Burke, L. E., Hudson, A. G., Warziski, M. T., Styn, M. A., Music, E., Elci, O. U., & Sereika, S. M. (2007). Effects of a vegetarian diet and treatment preference on biochemical and dietary variables in overweight and obese adults: a randomized clinical trial. The American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 86(3), pp. 588-96.
    Burke LE, et al. Effects of a Vegetarian Diet and Treatment Preference On Biochemical and Dietary Variables in Overweight and Obese Adults: a Randomized Clinical Trial. Am J Clin Nutr. 2007;86(3):588-96. PubMed PMID: 17823421.
    * Article titles in AMA citation format should be in sentence-case
    TY - JOUR T1 - Effects of a vegetarian diet and treatment preference on biochemical and dietary variables in overweight and obese adults: a randomized clinical trial. AU - Burke,Lora E, AU - Hudson,Alana G, AU - Warziski,Melanie T, AU - Styn,Mindi A, AU - Music,Edvin, AU - Elci,Okan U, AU - Sereika,Susan M, PY - 2007/9/8/pubmed PY - 2008/3/8/medline PY - 2007/9/8/entrez SP - 588 EP - 96 JF - The American journal of clinical nutrition JO - Am. J. Clin. Nutr. VL - 86 IS - 3 N2 - BACKGROUND: A vegetarian diet may lead to numerous health benefits, including weight loss. OBJECTIVE: We examined the joint effects of personal preference of dietary treatment and a calorie-restricted, low-fat lactoovovegetarian diet (LOV-D) compared with a standard calorie-restricted, low-fat omnivorous diet (STD-D) on changes in weight, total cholesterol, ratio of LDL to HDL cholesterol (LDL:HDL cholesterol), triacylglycerols, insulin resistance, and macronutrient intake during an 18-mo study. DESIGN: This was a randomized clinical trial of 176 overweight and obese adults who were recruited and randomly assigned first to 1 of 2 preference conditions (yes or no). If assigned to Preference-No, they were randomly assigned to 1 of the 2 diet conditions (STD-D or LOV-D). If assigned to Preference-Yes, they were assigned to the diet they indicated as preferred at screening. The 12-mo intervention was followed by a 6-mo maintenance phase. RESULTS: Participants were mainly women (86.9%) and white (70.5%); 75% completed the 18-mo study. A significant interaction between preference and dietary treatment was not observed for any of the outcome variables. However, participants in the Preference-No groups significantly decreased their triacylglycerols (P = 0.04). The only effect observed for diet was a borderline significant decrease in LDL:HDL cholesterol for the LOV-D group (P = 0.06). Within the LOV-D groups, those who were 100% adherent to the LOV-D had significant and marginally significant reductions in monounsaturated fat (P = 0.02) and total fat (P = 0.05) intakes at 18 mo. CONCLUSIONS: Our findings suggest that neither prescribing a vegetarian diet nor allowing persons to choose their preferred diet had a significant effect on outcome measures. However, all participants had a significant reduction in total energy and fat intakes and an increase in energy expenditure, which was reflected in reduced body weight. This clinical trial was registered at www.clinicaltrials.gov as NCT00330629. SN - 0002-9165 UR - https://www.unboundmedicine.com/medline/citation/17823421/full_citation L2 - https://academic.oup.com/ajcn/article-lookup/doi/10.1093/ajcn/86.3.588 DB - PRIME DP - Unbound Medicine ER -